Weimar Radicals

Monographs in German History

Book 28
Berghahn Books
Free sample

Exploring the gray zone of infiltration and subversion in which the Nazi and Communist parties sought to influence and undermine each other, this book offers a fresh perspective on the relationship between two defining ideologies of the twentieth century. The struggle between Fascism and Communism is situated within a broader conversation among right- and left-wing publicists, across the Youth Movement and in the “National Bolshevik” scene, thus revealing the existence of a discourse on revolutionary legitimacy fought according to a set of common assumptions about the qualities of the ideal revolutionary. Highlighting the importance of a masculine-militarist politics of youth revolt operative in both Marxist and anti-Marxist guises, Weimar Radicals forces us to re-think the fateful relationship between the two great ideological competitors of the Weimar Republic, while offering a challenging new interpretation of the distinctive radicalism of the interwar era.
Read more
Collapse

About the author

Timothy Scott Brown is Professor of History at Northeastern University and the author of West Germany and the Global Sixties: The Anti-Authoritarian Revolt, 1962–1978 (Cambridge 2013, 2015). He is the co-editor (with Andrew Lison) of The Global Sixties in Sound and Vision: Media, Counterculture, Revolt (Palgrave 2014), and (with Lorena Anton) of Between the Avant-Garde and the Everyday: Subversive Politics in Europe from 1957 to the Present (Berghahn 2011).

Read more
Collapse
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Berghahn Books
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Apr 1, 2009
Read more
Collapse
Pages
225
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9781845459086
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
History / Europe / Germany
History / Modern / 20th Century
Political Science / Political Ideologies / General
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Collapse
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Dollard's work makes important contributions to German cultural history, social history, and gender history, focusing attention on the construction of the stereotype of single women as abnormal, a problem to be solved, in Imperial Germany, and the way that the German women's movement co-opted this icon for its own purposes of reform. She also brings to attention several lesser-known German female activists who have often been overlooked. German Studies Review

[This book] is a considerable achievement. The Surplus Woman is essential reading not only for feminist historians but also for anyone with an interest in gender politics and culture and deserves a wide audience. Reviews in History

Dollard's insightful analysis of the centrality of the female surplus to women's rights activists is all the more provocative given that she so convincingly demonstrates in her first chapter that the surplus was a myth. Journal of Modern History

...transcends the usual analytical approach of earlier work...[and] examines a very broad spectrum of reformist, conservative, academic, socialist, feminist, and religious writers...It represents a new contribution to our understanding of the German women's movement. Nancy Reagin, Department of Women's and Gender Studies, Pace University

...the book is engaging, exciting and challenging to read because it provides a new framework for known material. It is also well written and at times poignant, examining the contradictory worlds of single women as construct and reality and showing their place in women activists' diverse efforts to challenge and reform their society. English Historical Review

The first German women's movement embraced the belief in a demographic surplus of unwed women, known as the Frauenüberschuß, as a central leitmotif in the campaign for reform. Proponents of the female surplus held that the advances of industry and urbanization had upset traditional marriage patterns and left too many bourgeois women without a husband. This book explores the ways in which the realms of literature, sexology, demography, socialism, and female activism addressed the perceived plight of unwed women. Case studies of reformers, including Lily Braun, Ruth Bré, Elisabeth Gnauck-Kühne, Helene Lange, Alice Salomon, Helene Stöcker, and Clara Zetkin, demonstrate the expansive influence of the discourse surrounding a female surfeit. By combining the approaches of cultural, social, and gender history, The Surplus Woman provides the first sustained analysis of the ways in which imperial Germans conceptualized anxiety about female marital status as both a product and a reflection of changing times.

Catherine L. Dollard received her Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and currently is Associate Professor of History at Denison University. She is the recipient of Bundeskanzler and Renewal Fellowships from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and also has received fellowships from DAAD, the Mellon Foundation, and the Lilly Foundation.

©2020 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.