Security in Wireless Ad Hoc and Sensor Networks

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This book provides an in-depth guide to security in wireless adhoc and sensor networks

Security in Wireless Ad Hoc and Sensor Networksintroduces the reader to the fundamentals and key issues related towireless ad hoc networking, with an emphasis on security. Itdiscusses the security attacks and counter measures in wireless adhoc, sensor and mesh networks, and briefly presents the standardson related topics. The authors offer a clear exposition of variouschallenges and solutions in this field including bootstrapping, keydistribution and exchange, authentication issues, privacy,anonymity and tamper resilience.

Key Features:

  • Introduces the fundamentals and key issues of the newtechnologies followed by comprehensive presentation on securityattacks and counter measures
  • Covers Denial of Service (DoS) attacks, hardware aspects ofsecure wireless ad hoc and sensor networks and secure routing
  • Contains information on cryptographic primitives and electronicwarfare
  • Includes problems at the end of each chapter to enhancelearning.

This book is well suited for graduate students in computer,electrical and communications engineering and computer sciencedepartments, researchers in academia and industry, as well as C4Iengineers and officers in the military. Wireless network designersfor internet service providers and mobile communications operatorswill also find this book very useful.

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About the author

Erdal Çayırcı graduated from the Army Academyin 1986 and from the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst in 1989. Hereceived his MS degree from the Middle East Technical Universityand a PhD from Bogazici University both in computer engineering in1995 and 2000, respectively. He retired from the army when he was acolonel in 2005. He was an Associate Professor at IstanbulTechnical University, Yeditepe University and the Naval Sciencesand Engineering Institute between 2001 and 2005. Also in 2001, hewas a visiting researcher for the Broadband and Wireless NetworkingLaboratory and a visiting lecturer at the School of Electrical andComputer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology. He iscurrently Chief, CAX Support Branch in NATO’s JointWarfareCenter in Stavanger, Norway, and also a professor in the Electricaland Computer Engineering Department of the University of Stavanger.His research interests include military constructive simulation,sensor networks, mobile communications and tactical communications.Professor Çayırcı has acted as an editor of thejournals IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing, Ad HocNetworks and Wireless Networks, and has guest editedfour special issues of Computer Networks, Ad HocNetworks and Special Topics in Mobile Networking andApplications (MONET). He received the 2002 IEEE CommunicationsSociety Best Tutorial Paper Award for his paper entitled ‘ASurvey on Sensor Networks’ published in the IEEECommunications Magazine in August 2002, the Fikri Gayret Awardfrom the Turkish Chief of General Staff in 2003, the Innovation ofthe Year Award from the Turkish Navy in 2005 and the ExcellenceAward in ITEC in 2006.

Chunming Rong received his bachelors, masters and PhDdegrees in Computer Science from the University of Bergen in Norwayin 1993, 1995 and 1998, respectively. In 1995–1998, he was aresearch fellow at the University of Bergen. In 2001–2003, hewas a post-doctoral researcher funded by Simula ResearchLaboratory. Currently, he is a Professor and chair of the computerscience section at the University of Stavanger. He has also servedas an adjunct Professor at the University Graduate Centre,University of Oslo, since 2005. Professor Rong was given theConocoPhilips Communication Award (Norway) in 2007. His paper‘New Infinite Families of 3-Designs from Preparata Codesover Z4 was awarded Editor’s Choice inDiscrete Mathematics in 1999. He is an associate editor ofthe International Journal of Computer Science & Applications(IJCSA) and served on the editorial board of theInternational Journal of Mobile Communications (IJMC)between 2003 and 2006. For the IEEE International Symposium onSecurity in Networks and Distributed Systems (SSNDS), he wasprogram chair in 2007 in Canada and general chair in 2008. For theInternational Conference on Autonomic and Trusted Computing (ATC),he was award chair in 2007 in Hong Kong and general chair in 2008in Norway. For the International Conference on UbiquitousIntelligence and Computing (UIC), he was general chair in 2008 inNorway. Professor Rong was chairman of the board of the Foundationof the Norwegian Computer Science Conference (NIK) from2005–2007, a board member of the Norwegian InformationSecurity Network (NISNet) from 2007–2011 and a member of theNorwegian Informatics Council (Nasjonalt fagråd forinformatikk). He has also been a member of the board for the‘ICT Security and Vulnerability (IKT-SoS)’ program atthe Research Council of Norway. He also currently serves in theworkgroup for Information Security in Integrated Operation at theNorwegian Oil Industry Association (OLF). As project manager, hehas received grants from the Research Council of Norway for theprojects ‘Integration of Data Processing in Oil and GasDrilling and Completion’ for 2008–2010, ‘Secureand Reliable Wireless and Ad Hoc Communications (SWACOM)’ for2006–2009 and ‘Integrated IP-based Services for SmartHome Environment (IS-Home)’ for 2007–2010. TheNorwegian Information Security Network (NISNet) also receivesannual funding from the Research Council of Norway. His researchinterests include computer and network security, wirelesscommunications, cryptography, identity management, electronicpayment, coding theory and semantic web technology.

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Additional Information

Publisher
John Wiley & Sons
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Published on
Dec 30, 2008
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Pages
280
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ISBN
9780470516775
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Technology & Engineering / Electrical
Technology & Engineering / Telecommunications
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Wireless communications offer organizations and users many benefits such as portability and flexibility, increased productivity, and lower installation costs. Wireless technologies cover a broad range of differing capabilities oriented toward different uses and needs. This chapter classifies wireless network security threats into one of nine categories: Errors and omissions; fraud and theft committed by authorized or unauthorized users of the system; employee sabotage; loss of physical and infrastructure support; malicious hackers; industrial espionage; malicious code; foreign government espionage; and, threats to personal privacy. All of the preceding represent potential threats to wireless networks. However, the more immediate concerns for wireless communications are fraud and theft, malicious hackers, malicious code, and industrial and foreign espionage. Theft is likely to occur with wireless devices due to their portability. Authorized and unauthorized users of the system may commit fraud and theft; however, the former are more likely to carry out such acts. Since users of a system may know what resources a system has and the system security flaws, it is easier for them to commit fraud and theft. Malicious hackers, sometimes called crackers, are individuals who break into a system without authorization, usually for personal gain or to do harm. Malicious hackers are generally individuals from outside of an organization (although users within an organization can be a threat as well). Such hackers may gain access to the wireless network access point by eavesdropping on wireless device communications. Malicious code involves viruses, worms, Trojan horses, logic bombs, or other unwanted software that is designed to damage files or bring down a system. Industrial and foreign espionage involve gathering proprietary data from corporations or intelligence information from governments through eavesdropping. In wireless networks, the espionage threat stems from the relative ease in which eavesdropping can occur on radio transmissions. This chapter provides an overview of wireless networking security technologies most commonly used in an office environment and by the mobile workforce of today. Also, this chapter seeks to assist organizations in reducing the risks associated with 802.11 wireless LANs, cellular networks, wireless ad hoc networks and for ensuring security when using handheld devices.
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