The Deaf Child in a Hearing Family: Nurturing Development

Plural Publishing
Free sample

For audiologists in clinic, for school-based audiologists and speech-language pathologists, and for special educators, the wisdom and many years experience shared here make this book an essential and practical guide to the effective management of hearing loss in children. This book is based on the assumption that the parents are hearing and that spoken-language competence has been established as a goal. Divided into six parts, the authors first summarize basic information on sound, hearing, hearing loss, language, speech, speech perception, and child development. For some readers, this will be a review of information already covered. For others it will serve as an introduction. Either way, it provides a background from which to draw implications about the management of hearing loss. The authors then move on to deal with sensory aspects of management, including information on hearing aids, cochlear implants, assistive listening devices, room acoustics, and lipreading. The assumption is that a first step in management is to optimize and capitalize on hearing when it is present and provide supplements when it is not. The third part deals with steps that can be taken to enrich the child’'s learning environment.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Plural Publishing
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Published on
Nov 1, 2011
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Pages
256
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ISBN
9781597566254
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Language
English
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Genres
Medical / Audiology & Speech Pathology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Binaural interference occurs when the speech input to one ear interferes with the input to the other ear during binaural stimulation. The first published study on binaural interference twenty-five years ago demonstrated that some individuals, particularly older individuals, perform more poorly with two hearing aids than with one and/or more poorly with binaural than monaural stimulation on electrophysiologic as well as behavioral measures. Binaural interference is relevant to every audiologist because it impacts the successful use of binaural hearing aids and may explain communicative difficulty in noise or other challenging listening situations in persons with normal-hearing sensitivity as well as persons with hearing loss.

This exciting new book written by two highly respected audiologists first traces the history of its study by researchers, then reviews the evidence, both direct and indirect, supporting its reality. This is followed by a discussion of the possible causes of the phenomenon and in-depth analysis of illustrative cases. The authors outline a systematic approach to the clinical detection, evaluation and amelioration of individuals who exhibit binaural interference. Suggestions are furnished on improved techniques for evaluation of the binaural advantage in general and on sensitized detection of the disorder in particular. The book ends with recommendations for future directions.

Given the adverse impact of binaural interference on auditory function and its occurrence in a significant subset of the population with hearing loss, as well as in some individuals with normal-hearing sensitivity, research on binaural interference only recently has begun to flourish, and adaptation of audiologic clinical practice to identify, assess, and manage individuals with binaural interference has yet to become widespread. The authors intend for the book to provide impetus for pursuing further research and to encourage audiologists to explore the possibility of binaural interference when patient complaints suggest it and when performing audiologic evaluations.

The book is intended for practicing clinical audiologists, audiology students, and hearing scientists. 

The third edition of Children With Hearing Loss: Developing Listening and Talking, Birth to Six provides updated information from the previous two editions for both professionals and parents facilitating spoken language through listening (auditory brain access, stimulation, and development) in infants and young children with hearing loss. Also addressed is auditory brain development, audiologic technologies, auditory skill development, spoken language development, as well as family-focused intervention for young children with hearing loss whose parents have chosen to have them learn to listen and talk.

Additionally, this new edition is expanded to reflect important and rapidly evolving changes that have developed in the past five years, including:

Application of neuroscience research to our knowledge of the foundations of listening and talking (Chapter 1)Current information on vestibular function in infants and young children (Chapters 2 and 3)Essential technology updates (Chapter 5)Expansion of the discussion of types of services a child with age-appropriate skills needs to sustain a positive academic trajectory (Chapter 6)Discussion of the use and efficacy of coaching and other parent guidance strategies (Chapter 10)Updated resources (Appendix 6)


This text is intended for undergraduate- and graduate-level training programs for professionals who work with children who have hearing loss and their families. This third edition is also a valuable resource for parents, listening and spoken language specialists (LSLS), speech-language pathologists, audiologists, early childhood instructors, and teachers. Furthermore, much of the information in Chapters 1 through 5 and Chapter 7 is beneficial to individuals of all ages with hearing loss, especially newly-diagnosed adults.

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