Rebuilding the Kāinga

BWB Texts

Book 78
Bridget Williams Books
Free sample

An understanding of the ways of our tūpuna, coupled with the best of new thinking from New Zealand and abroad, has significant potential for sustainable housing models.


Colonial settlement and the discriminatory policies of successive governments have challenged Māori connections to whenua and kāinga. Today, home ownership rates for Māori are well below the national average and Māori are over-represented in the statistics of substandard housing.


Rebuilding the Kāinga charts the recent resurgence of contemporary papakāinga on whenua Māori. Reframing Māori housing as a Treaty issue, Kake envisions a future where Māori are supported to build businesses and affordable homes on whānau, hapū or Treaty settlement lands. The implications of this approach, Kake writes, are transformative.

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About the author

Jade Kake - Ngāpuhi (Ngāti Hau me Te Parawhau), Te Whakatōhea, Te Arawa, BArchDes, GradCertDigDes, MArch(Prof) - is an architectural designer, housing advocate and researcher. She has experience working directly with Māori land trusts and other Māori organisations to realise their aspirations, particularly around papakāinga housing and marae development, and in working with mana whenua groups to express their cultural values and narratives through the design of their physical environments. Jade is fortunate to live within her home area of Whangarei, where she is leading several projects to support the re-establishment and development of papakāinga communities. In 2019, she will hold a writers’ residency at the Michael King Writers Centre.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Bridget Williams Books
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Published on
Oct 24, 2019
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Pages
160
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ISBN
9781988545301
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Colonialism & Post-Colonialism
Political Science / Public Policy / Social Policy
Political Science / World / Australian & Oceanian
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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