The Mystery of the Missing Antimatter

Princeton University Press
Free sample

In the first fractions of a second after the Big Bang lingers a question at the heart of our very existence: why does the universe contain matter but almost no antimatter? The laws of physics tell us that equal amounts of matter and antimatter were produced in the early universe—but then something odd happened. Matter won out over antimatter; had it not, the universe today would be dark and barren.

But how and when did this occur? In The Mystery of the Missing Antimatter, Helen Quinn and Yossi Nir guide readers into the very heart of this mystery—and along the way offer an exhilarating grand tour of cutting-edge physics.

Read more

About the author

Helen R. Quinn is professor emerita of particle physics and astrophysics at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center at Stanford University. A member of the National Academy of Sciences, she is the coauthor of The Charm of Strange Quarks: Mysteries and Revolutions of Particle Physics. Yossi Nir is professor of physics at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel.
Read more


3 total

Additional Information

Princeton University Press
Read more
Published on
Jan 1, 2010
Read more
Read more
Read more
Read more
Science / Cosmology
Science / General
Science / Physics / General
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
In this splendidly lucid and profusely illustrated book, a Nobel laureate relates the fascinating story of Einstein, the general and special theories of relativity, and the scientists before and since who influenced relativity's genesis and development. Eschewing technical terms in favor of ordinary language, the book offers a perfect introduction to relativity for readers without specialized knowledge of mathematics and science.
The author follows Einstein's own dictum to make explanations "as simple as possible, but not more so." His periodic use of equations as points of clarification involve nothing more than simple algebra; these can be disregarded by math-averse readers. Dr. Schwinger begins with a discussion of the conflict between two principles of electromagnetic theory that are irreconcilable in Newtonian physics, and how Einstein's attempts to resolve this conflict led to the theory of relativity. Readers learn about the meaning of time and the paradoxes of space travel at speeds close to that of light, following the development of Einstein's relativistic thought and his epochal perception that E=mc2. Further chapters examine gravity and its effect on light; non-Euclidean geometry and the curving of space-time; and the impact of radio astronomy and space-age discoveries upon Einstein's model of the universe.
Amusing quotes, suppositions, and illustrative fictions — along with numerous sidebars and boxes explaining physical principles, anomalies, events, and inventions — enhance this accessible introduction, and provide stimulating food for thought. Preface. 189 black-and-white illustrations. Sources of the Illustrations. Index.
©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.