Black Georgetown Remembered: A History of Its Black Community from the Founding of “The Town of George” in 1751 to the Present Day, 25th Anniversary Edition

Georgetown University Press
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First published in 1991, Black Georgetown Remembered chronicles and celebrates the rich but little-known history of the Georgetown black community from the colonial period to the present. Drawing on primary sources, including oral interviews with past and current residents and extensive research in church and historical society archives, the authors record the hopes, dreams, disappointments, and successes of a vibrant neighborhood as it persevered through slavery and segregation, war and peace, prosperity and depression.

This beautiful commemorative 25th anniversary edition of Black Georgetown Remembered, with a new introduction by Kathleen Menzie Lesko and a foreword by Maurice Jackson, is completely redesigned and features high-quality scans of more than two hundred illustrations, including portraits of prominent community leaders, sketches, maps, and nineteenth-century and contemporary photographs. Kathleen Menzie Lesko’s new introduction describes the impact of this book and a companion documentary video over twenty-five years and updates readers on recent changes in the Georgetown neighborhood.

Black Georgetown Remembered is a compelling and inspiring journey through more than two hundred years of history. A one-of-a-kind book, it invites readers to share in the lives, dreams, aspirations, struggles, and triumphs of real people, to join them in their churches, at home, and on the street, and to consider how the unique heritage of this neighborhood intersects and contributes to broader themes in African American and Washington, DC, history and urban studies.

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About the author

Kathleen Menzie Lesko is a former scholar-in-residence at the Folger Shakespeare Library and current research scholar at the Huntington Library in San Marino, California.

Valerie Babb is the Franklin Professor of English and director of the Institute for African American Studies at the University of Georgia.

Carroll R. Gibbs is a professional historian, lecturer, and author of numerous works on African American history.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Georgetown University Press
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Published on
Feb 28, 2016
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Pages
232
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ISBN
9781626163270
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Language
English
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Genres
History / African American
History / General
History / United States / 21st Century
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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