The Politics of People: Protest Cultures in China

SUNY Press
Free sample

Explores the cultural dimensions of protest and dissent in China, focusing on dramatic forms of bodily, spatial, strategic, and artistic performativity.


Since the 1989 Tiananmen Square occupation, mainland China, Hong Kong, and Macau have experienced an increase in and persistence of mass gatherings, demonstrations, and blockades staged as a means of protesting the ways in which people are governed. In this book, Shih-Diing Liu argues that these popular protests are poorly understood, because they are viewed through the lens of protests and occupations globally, with insufficient attention given to their distinctively local aspects. He provides a better account of these distinctively Chinese-style occupations by describing, contextualizing, and analyzing a range of relevant recent case studies. Liu draws on theoretical concepts developed by Judith Butler, Jacques Rancière, Ernesto Laclau, and other contemporary critical theorists and shows the importance of considering bodily, spatial, and visual dimensions of these protests. By seeing them as staged, contentious performances, the author demonstrates how these precarious populations mobilize their bodies and symbolic resources offered by the Chinese government to open up temporary spaces of appearance to articulate their grievances, and argues that this kind of embodied and performative analysis should be more widely conducted in studies of popular politics worldwide.


The Politics of People is a direct challenge to the Sinological straightjacket of thinking about political action, resistance, and Occupy movements. It is also a thoroughgoing critique of how postcolonial studies has not pushed us very far in our thinking about popular politics, and how the rich literature on the Occupy movement in the United States and European context has failed to think recent protests and political action movements into the global theorization of Occupy.” — Ralph Litzinger, coeditor of Ghost Protocol: Development and Displacement in Global China

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About the author

Shih-Diing Liu is Professor of Communication at the University of Macau, Macau SAR, China.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
Sep 1, 2019
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Pages
248
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ISBN
9781438476223
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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