Narrative of the life of Frederick Douglass Written by Himself (Full Text). Introduction by Atidem Aroha.

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Frederick Douglass was a man of his time and race, a leader and fighter against the irrational and inhuman treatment of the blacks. This narrative is one of the most influential among African-American books denouncing the Institution of Slavery. It was written in 1845, over fifty years after the narrative of the great son of Africa Olaudah Equiano (1797). Being a slave himself, the accounts Douglass narrates are very important as a primary source describing the endurances and tribulations he had suffered under the slavery of the Southern territories, especially in Maryland. His life was full of bitterness, grief and sorrow; but certainly he became a great man indeed...also against all odds.

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This carefully crafted ebook: "Slavery: Not Forgiven, Never Forgotten" is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents: Memoirs Narrative of Frederick Douglass 12 Years a Slave The Underground Railroad Up From Slavery Willie Lynch Letter Confessions of Nat Turner Narrative of Sojourner Truth Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl History of Mary Prince Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom Thirty Years a Slave Narrative of the Life of J. D. Green The Life of Olaudah Equiano Behind The Scenes Harriet: The Moses of Her People Father Henson's Story of His Own Life 50 Years in Chains Twenty-Two Years a Slave and Forty Years a Freeman Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Henry Bibb Narrative of William W. Brown, a Fugitive Slave Story of Mattie J. Jackson A Slave Girl's Story From the Darkness Cometh the Light Narrative of the Life of Moses Grandy Narrative of Joanna Narrative of the Life of Henry Box Brown, Who Escaped in a 3x2 Feet Box Memoir and Poems of Phillis Wheatley Buried Alive (Behind Prison Walls) For a Quarter of a Century Sketches of the Life of Joseph Mountain Novels Oroonoko Uncle Tom's Cabin Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Heroic Slave Slavery's Pleasant Homes Our Nig Clotelle Marrow of Tradition Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man A Fool's Errand Bricks Without Straw Imperium in Imperio The Hindered Hand Historical Documents The History of Abolition of African Slave-Trade History of American Abolitionism Pictures of Slavery in Church and State Life, Last Words and Dying Speech of Stephen Smith Who Was Executed for Burglary Report on Charge of Aiding and Abetting in the Rescue of a Fugitive Slave Southern Horrors: Lynch Law in All Its Phases Duty of Disobedience to the Fugitive Slave Act Emancipation Proclamation (1863) Gettysburg Address XIII Amendment to the U.S. Constitution (1865) Civil Rights Act of 1866 XIV Amendment to the U.S. Constitution (1868) Reconstruction Acts (1867-1868) ...
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Publisher
Alejandro's Libros
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Published on
Jul 12, 2013
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Pages
133
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ISBN
9781490975832
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Language
English
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Genres
Literary Collections / American / African American
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Slave narratives were one of the earliest forms of African American writing. These works, autobiographical in nature, later fostered other pieces of African American autobiography. Since the rise of Black Studies in the late 1960s, leading critics have constructed black lives and letters as antitheses of the ways and writings of mainstream American culture. According to such thinking, black writing stems from a set of experiences very different from the world of whites, and black autobiography must therefore differ radically from heroic white American tales. But in pointing to differences between black and white autobiographical works, these critics have overlooked the similarities. This volume argues that the African American autobiography is a continuation of the epic tradition, much as the prose narratives of voyage by white Americans in the nineteenth century likewise represent the evolution of the epic genre. The book makes clear that the writers of black autobiography have shared and shaped American culture, and that their works are very much a part of American literature.

An introductory essay provides a theoretical framework for the chapters that follow. It discusses the origins of African American autobiography and the larger themes of the epic tradition that are common to the works of both black and white authors. The book then pairs representative African American autobiographies with similar works by white writers. Thus the volume matches Olaudah Equiano's slave narrative with The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave with Richard Henry Dana's Two Years Before the Mast, and Harriet Jacobs' Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl with Fanny Fern's Ruth Hall. The study indicates that these various works all recognize the importance of learning as a means for attaining freedom. The final chapter provides a broad survey of the African American autobiography.

African American slave narratives of the 19th century recorded the atrocities of the antebellum South and provided a solid foundation for the African American literary tradition. By presenting 16 slave narratives in their entirety, this reference conveniently documents this historically significant literary genre. A vivid and moving history of African Americans seeking to establish community, liberty, economic independence, and education within the constraints of a repressive society. This reference intentionally avoids well-known narratives and instead collects unavailable and otherwise difficult-to-find texts. To add to the value of the work for researchers and general readers alike, each narrative is accompanied by a preface, explanatory notes, and suggestions for further reading.

Many of the narratives gathered here were influential when initially published; Josiah Henson's presentation of himself, for example, embodies many of the characteristics given to Uncle Tom by Harriet Beecher Stowe in her novel Uncle Tom's Cabin. While other collections often only provide excerpts from widely available texts, this reference includes complete narratives. The introductions and annotations redefine current thinking in the field by closely examining how these authors used language, structured their writing, and crafted their autobiographies. By examining the historical, cultural, literary, and social issues that African Americans have faced since their arrival, this reference provides the broad context necessary to understand the literary, social, and intellectual traditions from which these writings developed.

The beauty and spirit of Maya Angelou’s words live on in this complete collection of poetry.

Throughout her illustrious career in letters, Maya Angelou gifted, healed, and inspired the world with her words. Now the beauty and spirit of those words live on in this new and complete collection of poetry that reflects and honors the writer’s remarkable life.
 
Every poetic phrase, every poignant verse can be found within the pages of this sure-to-be-treasured volume—from her reflections on African American life and hardship in the compilation Just Give Me a Cool Drink of Water ’fore I Diiie (“Though there’s one thing that I cry for / I believe enough to die for / That is every man’s responsibility to man”) to her revolutionary celebrations of womanhood in the poem “Still I Rise” (“Out of the huts of history’s shame / I rise / Up from a past that’s rooted in pain / I rise”) to her “On the Pulse of Morning” tribute at President William Jefferson Clinton’s inauguration (“Lift up your eyes upon / The day breaking for you. / Give birth again / To the dream.”).
 
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“I feared if I let you go
You would leave me eternally.
You smiled at my fears, saying
I could not stay in your lap forever”
 
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At the lintel of the world we most need.
We are here roaring and singing.
We prove that we can not only make peace, we can bring it with us.”
 
Timeless and prescient, this definitive compendium will warm the hearts of Maya Angelou’s most ardent admirers as it introduces new readers to the legendary poet, activist, and teacher—a phenomenal woman for the ages.
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