Hollywood Puzzle Films

Routledge
Free sample

From Inception to The Lake House, moviegoers are increasingly flocking to narratologically complex puzzle films. These puzzle movies borrow techniques—like fragmented spatio-temporal reality, time loops, unstable characters with split identities or unreliable narrators—more commonly attributed to art cinema and independent films. The essays in Hollywood Puzzle Films examine the appropriation of puzzle film techniques by contemporary Hollywood dramas and blockbusters through questions of narrative, time, and altered realities. Analyzing movies like Source Code, The Butterfly Effect, Donnie Darko, Déjà Vu, and adaptations of Philip K. Dick, contributors explore the implications of Hollywood's new movie mind games.
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About the author

Warren Buckland

is Reader in Film Studies at Oxford Brookes University. He is the author/editor of nine books, including The Routledge Encyclopedia of Film Theory (with Edward Branigan; Routledge, 2013), Film Theory and Contemporary Hollywood Movies (Routledge, 2009), and Studying Contemporary American Film: A Guide to Movie Analysis (with Thomas Elsaesser; Bloomsbury, 2002). He also edits the New Review of Film and Television Studies.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
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Published on
May 30, 2014
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Pages
310
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ISBN
9781136256288
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Art / Film & Video
Performing Arts / Film / History & Criticism
Social Science / Media Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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