The Nutritionist: Food, Nutrition, and Optimal Health

Routledge
Free sample

Use this valuable book to make better food/diet/nutrition supplement choices for your clients (and yourself)!The Nutritionist provides an overview of the basic concepts involved in nourishing the human body in an organized and progressive first-person question-and-answer format. Its eminently readable style and easy-to-understand graphics will enhance your comprehension of applied nutrition topics such as energy nutrients, vitamins, and minerals as well as energy metabolism and body composition, exercise, heart disease, and cancers.Healthcare professionals, personal trainers, nutritionists, and lay readers will all find valuable, easily understood information in The Nutritionist. The book lays the foundation with a review of the basic concepts of body composition and related scientific concepts, which are invaluable in understanding the nutrition information that follows. It examines molecules, chemical reactions, energy, acids and bases (pH), free radicals and oxidation, and water solubility. With this foundation, concepts such as lipoproteins (LDL, HDL, blood cholesterol), antioxidants, energy, metabolism, body composition, exercise, heart disease, and cancer are easily understandable.This unique book’s first-person, question-and-answer style brings you quick access to current information about nutrition and:
  • energy metabolism
  • energy nutrients
  • weight control
  • body composition
  • exercise
  • vitamins and minerals
  • nutrition supplements
  • osteoporosis
  • diabetes mellitus
  • heart disease
  • cancer
  • and more!The Nutritionist provides straightforward answers to basic questions about the body and how to nourish it. Use it to make better choices for your clients and to help them reach the performance and health goals they set.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
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Published on
Dec 6, 2012
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Pages
436
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ISBN
9781136397554
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Language
English
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Genres
Health & Fitness / Diet & Nutrition / Nutrition
Medical / Health Care Delivery
Sports & Recreation / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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The “wrenching but inspiring” true story of a tragic medical mistake that turned a grieving mother into a national advocate (The Wall Street Journal).
 
Sorrel King was a young mother of four when her eighteen-month-old daughter was badly burned by a faulty water heater in the family’s new home. Taken to the world-renowned Johns Hopkins Hospital, Josie made a remarkable recovery. But as she was preparing to leave, the hospital’s system of communication broke down and Josie was given a fatal shot of methadone, sending her into cardiac arrest. Within forty-eight hours, the King family went from planning a homecoming to planning a funeral.
 
Dizzy with grief, falling into deep depression, and close to ending her marriage, Sorrel slowly pulled herself and her life back together. Accepting Hopkins’ settlement, she and her husband established the Josie King Foundation. They began to implement basic programs in hospitals emphasizing communication between patients, family, and medical staff—programs like Family-Activated Rapid Response Teams, which are now in place in hospitals around the country. Today Sorrel and the work of the foundation have had a tremendous impact on health-care providers, making medical care safer for all of us, and earning Sorrel a well-deserved reputation as one of the leading voices in patient safety.
 
“I cried . . . I cheered” at this account of one woman’s unlikely path from full-time mom to nationally renowned patient advocate (Ann Hood). “Part indictment, part celebration, part catharsis” Josie’s Story is the startling, moving, and inspirational chronicle of how a mother—and her unforgettable daughter—are transforming the face of American medicine (Richmond Times-Dispatch).
Editor of the award-winning site Feministing.com, Maya Dusenbery brings together scientific and sociological research, interviews with doctors and researchers, and personal stories from women across the country to provide the first comprehensive, accessible look at how sexism in medicine harms women today.

In Doing Harm, Dusenbery explores the deep, systemic problems that underlie women’s experiences of feeling dismissed by the medical system. Women have been discharged from the emergency room mid-heart attack with a prescription for anti-anxiety meds, while others with autoimmune diseases have been labeled “chronic complainers” for years before being properly diagnosed. Women with endometriosis have been told they are just overreacting to “normal” menstrual cramps, while still others have “contested” illnesses like chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia that, dogged by psychosomatic suspicions, have yet to be fully accepted as “real” diseases by the whole of the profession.

An eye-opening read for patients and health care providers alike, Doing Harm shows how women suffer because the medical community knows relatively less about their diseases and bodies and too often doesn’t trust their reports of their symptoms. The research community has neglected conditions that disproportionately affect women and paid little attention to biological differences between the sexes in everything from drug metabolism to the disease factors—even the symptoms of a heart attack. Meanwhile, a long history of viewing women as especially prone to “hysteria” reverberates to the present day, leaving women battling against a stereotype that they’re hypochondriacs whose ailments are likely to be “all in their heads.” 

Offering a clear-eyed explanation of the root causes of this insidious and entrenched bias and laying out its sometimes catastrophic consequences, Doing Harm is a rallying wake-up call that will change the way we look at health care for women.

 

Pathologies of Power uses harrowing stories of illness, of life—and death—in extreme situations to interrogate our understanding of human rights. Paul Farmer, a physician and anthropologist with twenty years of experience studying diseases in Haiti, Peru, and Russia, argues that promoting the social and economic rights of the world’s poor is the most important human rights struggle of our times. A thoughtful memoir with passionate eyewitness accounts from the prisons of Russia and the beleaguered villages of Haiti and Chiapas, this book links the lived experiences of individual victims to a broader analysis of structural violence. Farmer challenges conventional thinking within human rights circles and exposes the relationships between political and economic injustice, on one hand, and the suffering and illness of the powerless, on the other.

Farmer shows that the same social forces that give rise to epidemic diseases such as HIV and tuberculosis also sculpt risk for human rights violations. He illustrates the ways that racism and gender inequality in the United States are mirrored in pathology, plague, disease and death. Yet this doctor’s autobiography is far from a hopeless inventory of human suffering. Farmer’s disturbing examples are linked to a guarded optimism that new medical and social technologies will develop in tandem with a more informed sense of social justice. Otherwise, he concludes, we will be guilty of managing social inequality rather than addressing structural violence. Farmer’s urgent plea to think about human rights in the context of global public health and to consider critical issues of quality and access for the world’s poor should be of fundamental concern to pathologists, medical students, and humanitarians in a world characterized by the bizarre proximity of surfeit and suffering.
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