Emily Dickinson: A Medicine Woman for Our Times

Fisher King Press
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 Among the 19th century poets, Emily Dickinson is by far the most scientifically minded. Science is the voice that summoned Dickinson at Mount Holyoke Female Seminary and gave her unique distinction as a poetess of botanical and entomological and astronomical classifications. Like no other 19th century poet she forms an integration between science and spirituality. She studied at Holyoke at the exact historical moment of the first Seneca Falls Women’s Rights Convention in 1848. This, therefore, is a feminist book. It speaks up for the Divine Feminine. On the front cover purple-white rosemary blossoms are exploding with color. Emily Dickinson’s garden was a place where butterflies, bees, and hummingbirds drank up the radiance of flowers. Rosemary in particular was one of her favorite healing herbs. C.G. Jung mentions the antitoxin of rosemary flowers as a synonym for the Self, the total personality. When Steven Herrmann refers to Emily Dickinson as a Medicine Woman, he is speaking of an archetype of healing within all humans. Her poems are enduring imprints of the Medicine Woman archetype. It is by access to the Medicine Woman archetype that she’s able to espouse a democracy of equality that the world needs right now. She advises women to cherish “Power” and take heed from the Serpent. We need a Medicine Woman to balance things out. In a democratic sense, she’s a fierce and uncompromising spokeswoman for Liberty. She is a dispenser of a new American myth for our times.
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About the author

 Recognized internationally, Steven Herrmann is the author of William Everson: The Shaman’s Call, Walt Whitman: Shamanism, Spiritual Democracy, and the World Soul, and Spiritual Democracy: The Wisdom of Early American Visionaries for the Journey Forward. In 2015 his  chapter “C.G. Jung and Teilhard de Chardin: Peacemakers in an Age of Spiritual Democracy” was published in Pierre Teilhard de Chardin and Carl Gustav Jung Side by Side. He has taught on the subjects of Jung, Whitman, and Melville at the C.G. Jung Institutes of San Francisco, Chicago, and Zürich, UC Berkeley and UC Santa Cruz, and on Jung and James at Yale University. Herrmann’s expertise in Jungian Literary Criticism makes him one of the seminal thinkers in the international field, and a foremost authority on Whitman, Melville, and now Dickinson in post-Jungian studies.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Fisher King Press
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Published on
Mar 21, 2018
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Pages
298
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ISBN
9781771690416
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Language
English
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Genres
Psychology / Movements / Jungian
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Love Matters for Psychic Transformation is woven by a profound respect and love for the soul and the transformative powers of the Body Psyche. It is an exploration of the embodied psychic transformation in the specific context of the BodySoul Rhythms® work (BSR) developed by Ann Skinner, Mary Hamilton, and Marion Woodman. In describing the BSR work, interviewing six women about their experiences, and linking the BSR approach with the new neuroscience, developmental psychology, change in therapy, attachment theory, and relational trauma, Dr. Reinau brings to light all that the BSR approach has to offer.


It is with relief and pleasure that I write this endorsement. Relief comes because someone with clarity, accuracy, and care has outlined the “consonants” of the work of BSR. Pleasure because the “vowels” of the work have been explored in an authentic voice from an open heart, with a keen intelligence, and from several well-studied points of view. Once again Maja Reinau has put on her diving costume, gone down, and this time surfaced with the pearl: Love Matters in Psychic Transformation. Thank you Maja. –Ann Skinner, co-creator of Body Soul Rhythms

Love Matters For Psychic Transformation is a gift to the many women who have benefited from the BSR-work. Dr. Reinau is able to delve deeply into the methodology of BodySoul work without destroying the mystery. It is a treasure of information for those who seek this way of transformation in their lives. The interviews deepen the mystery as well as the understanding of the work. Dr. Reinau’s ability to link BodySoul experience to early developmental theories and to neuroscience provides the path to her conclusion that it is all about love. A conclusion with which I am sure Marion Woodman would agree. Everyone who seriously considers understanding BodySoul work should read Love Matters for Psychic Transformation. –Patricia C. Patrick, M.A., M.D., Child Adolescent and Adults Psychiatrist, The Marion Woodman BodySoul Rhythms Leadership Training Board Member, Marion Woodman Foundation, Teaching Member Sand Play Therapist Association

Man and His Symbols owes its existence to one of Jung's own dreams. The great psychologist dreamed that his work was understood by a wide public, rather than just by psychiatrists, and therefore he agreed to write and edit this fascinating book. Here, Jung examines the full world of the unconscious, whose language he believed to be the symbols constantly revealed in dreams. Convinced that dreams offer practical advice, sent from the unconscious to the conscious self, Jung felt that self-understanding would lead to a full and productive life. Thus, the reader will gain new insights into himself from this thoughtful volume, which also illustrates symbols throughout history. Completed just before his death by Jung and his associates, it is clearly addressed to the general reader.

Praise for Man and His Symbols

“This book, which was the last piece of work undertaken by Jung before his death in 1961, provides a unique opportunity to assess his contribution to the life and thought of our time, for it was also his firsat attempt to present his life-work in psychology to a non-technical public. . . . What emerges with great clarity from the book is that Jung has done immense service both to psychology as a science and to our general understanding of man in society, by insisting that imaginative life must be taken seriously in its own right, as the most distinctive characteristic of human beings.”—Guardian

“Straighforward to read and rich in suggestion.”—John Barkham, Saturday Review Syndicate

“This book will be a resounding success for those who read it.”—Galveston News-Tribune

“A magnificent achievement.”—Main Currents

“Factual and revealing.”—Atlanta Times
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