Churches of Minnesota: An Illustrated Guide

U of Minnesota Press
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Churches are among the most profound and long-lasting expressions of faith, reflecting the heritage, beliefs, and traditions of their congregations. Whether they are elaborate or austere, traditional or modern, they are places to visit and admire, whatever your creed. In Churches of Minnesota, Alan Lathrop profiles more than one hundred religious buildings in a valuable compendium made even richer by the photography of Bob Firth. More than 140 black-and-white and full-color images present a comprehensive view of the architectural styles that make up Minnesota's religious and cultural heritage. Lathrop embarked on a journey to explore the architectural histories of churches in every corner of Minnesota, and what he found was a panorama of designs steeped in the traditions of their communities. From the board and batten siding on the tiny St. Mark's Episcopal Chapel in Annandale to the grand elegance of St. Paul's cathedral, Lathrop discusses a variety of architectural styles in both urban and rural settings across the state. He reveals the intrinsic character of these buildings and uncovers the enchanting stories behind the lives of those connected to each church--the architects, the leaders, the parishioners--and the history that brought them to where they are today. By enticing his readers to explore the pleasures of architecture, Lathrop has created a valuable resource not only for those with an interest in ecclesiastical design and tradition, but also for anyone who simply cherishes the beauty and character of Minnesota's churches. An inspiring exploration of the architectural heritage of Minnesota's churches.
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About the author

Alan K. Lathrop is professor and curator of the Northwest Architectural Archives, University of Minnesota Libraries.
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Publisher
U of Minnesota Press
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Pages
306
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ISBN
9781452904405
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Language
English
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This content is DRM protected.
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