Accused #13 in the Shah's Iran: A Memoir of Injustice

McFarland
Free sample

In 1953, Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi—the Shah of Iran—rose to absolute power in a CIA-assisted coup d’état dubbed Operation Ajax. As Iranian citizens began to learn of their government’s involvement in the coup, ordinary people—scholars, lawyers, students, military personnel—began to disappear. Drawing on the political and geographic history of Iran before the 1979 Revolution, this memoir of a political prisoner of the Shah’s regime recounts a soldier’s brutal arrest, imprisonment, interrogation and torture by state security over 50 days in 1969 and 1970.
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About the author

Kian Parsi was born in Tehran and studied economics at Tehran University. As a professor of economics in the United States and Iran, he has written numerous publications on the subject. Writer/editor Phillip Villarreal has worked with many authors, most notably Firouzeh Razavi. He lives in San Dimas, California.
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Additional Information

Publisher
McFarland
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Published on
Aug 16, 2016
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Pages
200
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ISBN
9781476626505
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Personal Memoirs
History / World
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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