Derrida and Joyce: Texts and Contexts

SUNY Press
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All of Derrida’s texts on Joyce together under one cover in fresh, new translations, along with key essays covering the range of Derrida’s engagement with Joyce’s works.

Bringing together all of Jacques Derrida’s writings on James Joyce, this volume includes the first complete translation of his book Ulysses Gramophone: Two Words for Joyce as well as the first translation of the essay “The Night Watch.” In Ulysses Gramophone, Derrida provides some of his most thorough reflections on affirmation and the “yes,” the signature, and the role of technological mediation in all of these areas. In “The Night Watch,” Derrida pursues his ruminations on writing in an explicitly feminist direction, offering profound observations on the connection between writing and matricide. Accompanying these texts are nine essays by leading scholars from across the humanities addressing Derrida’s treatments of Joyce throughout his work, and two remembrances of lectures devoted to Joyce that Derrida gave in 1982 and 1984. The volume concludes with photographs of Derrida from these two events. 

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About the author

 Andrew J. Mitchell is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Emory University. He is the author of Heidegger Among the Sculptors: Body, Space, and the Art of Dwelling. 

Sam Slote 
is Assistant Professor of English at Trinity College Dublin. He is the author of The Silence in Progress of Dante, Mallarmé and Joyce and coeditor (with Luca Crispi) of How Joyce Wrote Finnegans Wake: A Chapter-by-Chapter Genetic Guide.

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Additional Information

SUNY Press
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Published on
Apr 15, 2013
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Literary Criticism / European / English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh
Literary Criticism / Semiotics & Theory
Philosophy / General
Philosophy / Movements / Deconstruction
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Eligible for Family Library

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The 2014 publication of the first three volumes of Martin Heidegger’s Black Notebooks, the philosopher’s private writings from the war years, sparked international controversy. While Heidegger’s engagement with National Socialism was well known, as were a handful of his private anti-Semitic comments, the Black Notebooks showed for the first time that this anti-Semitism was not merely a personal resentment.The notebooks contain not just anti-Semitic remarks but anti-Semitism deeply embedded in the language of his thought. In them, Heidegger tried to assign a philosophical significance to anti-Semitism, with “the Jew” or “world Judaism” cast as antagonist in his project.

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