Churches of Nova Scotia

Dundurn
Free sample

Churches of Nova Scotia is as much a human interest book as it is about ecclesiastical buildings. Both text and photographs tell the story of more than 30 Nova Scotia churches, but in the telling, the relationship between the interior life and history of the churches and the exterior and architecture of the church buildings is explored. The book is well balanced, containing a selection of churches from all parts of the province and representing a variety of denominational and ethnic identities, time periods, and architectural styles.
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About the author

Robert Tuck was born in Bridgewater, Nova Scotia and before following his family into the Anglican priesthood he reported for the Halifax Chronicle and taught at King's School. He settled in Charlottetown, PEI in 1992 where he occupies a canon's stall at St. Peter's Cathedral. Since then, he has curated exhibitions at the Confederation Centre of the Arts on a variety of Island topics, including the subject of his first book with Dundurn, Gothic Dreams: The Life and Times of William Critchlow, 1845-1913.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Dundurn
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Published on
Oct 1, 2003
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Pages
160
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ISBN
9781459712652
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Language
English
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Genres
Architecture / Buildings / Religious
History / Canada / General
History / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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