Bioactive Proteins and Peptides as Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals

Institute of Food Technologists Series

Book 29
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Bioactive Proteins and Peptides as Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals highlights recent developments of nutraceutical proteins and peptides for the promotion of human health. The book considers fundamental concepts and structure-activity relations for the major classes of nutraceutical proteins and peptides. Coverage includes functional proteins and peptides from numerous sources including: soy, Pacific hake, bovine muscle, peas, wheat, fermented milk, eggs, casein, fish collagen, bovine lactoferrin, and rice. The international panel of experts from industry and academia also reviews current applications and future opportunities within the nutraceutical proteins and peptides sector.
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About the author

YOSHINORI MINE, PhD, is Professor in the Department of FoodScience at the University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

EUNICE LI-CHAN, PhD, is Professor of Food, Nutrition andHealth in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems, University ofBritish Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

BO JIANG, PhD, is Professor of Food Science and ExecutiveDirector of the Key State Laboratory of Food Science andTechnology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China.

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Additional Information

Publisher
John Wiley & Sons
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Published on
Jun 9, 2011
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Pages
436
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ISBN
9780470961742
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Life Sciences / Horticulture
Technology & Engineering / Food Science / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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