Bioactive Proteins and Peptides as Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals

Institute of Food Technologists Series

Book 29
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Bioactive Proteins and Peptides as Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals highlights recent developments of nutraceutical proteins and peptides for the promotion of human health. The book considers fundamental concepts and structure-activity relations for the major classes of nutraceutical proteins and peptides. Coverage includes functional proteins and peptides from numerous sources including: soy, Pacific hake, bovine muscle, peas, wheat, fermented milk, eggs, casein, fish collagen, bovine lactoferrin, and rice. The international panel of experts from industry and academia also reviews current applications and future opportunities within the nutraceutical proteins and peptides sector.
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About the author

YOSHINORI MINE, PhD, is Professor in the Department of Food Science at the University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

EUNICE LI-CHAN, PhD, is Professor of Food, Nutrition and Health in the Faculty of Land and Food Systems, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

BO JIANG, PhD, is Professor of Food Science and Executive Director of the Key State Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China.

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Additional Information

Publisher
John Wiley & Sons
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Published on
Jun 9, 2011
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Pages
436
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ISBN
9780470961742
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Life Sciences / Horticulture
Technology & Engineering / Food Science / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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The food industry has utilized automated control systems for over a quarter of a century. However, the past decade has seen an increase in the use of more sophisticated software-driven, on-line control systems, especially in thermal processing unit operations. As these software-driven control systems have become more complex, the need to validate their operation has become more important. In addition to validating new control systems, some food companies have undertaken the more difficult task of validating legacy control systems that have been operating for a number of years on retorts or aseptic systems.

Thermal Processing: Control and Automation presents an overview of various facets of thermal processing and packaging from industry, academic, and government representatives. The book contains information that will be valuable not only to a person interested in understanding the fundamental aspects of thermal processing (eg graduate students), but also to those involved in designing the processes (eg process specialists based in food manufacturing) and those who are involved in process filing with USDA or FDA. The book focuses on technical aspects, both from a thermal processing standpoint and from an automation and process control standpoint. Coverage includes established technologies such as retorting as well as emerging technologies such as continuous flow microwave processing. The book addresses both the theoretical and applied aspects of thermal processing, concluding with speculations on future trends and directions.

Not since "Sugar Chemistry" by Shallenberger and Birch (1975) has a text clearly presented and applied basic carbohydrate chemistry to the quality attributes and functional properties of foods. Now in Food Carbohydrate Chemistry, author Wrolstad emphasizes the application of carbohydrate chemistry to understanding the chemistry, physical and functional properties of food carbohydrates. Structure and nomenclature of sugars and sugar derivatives are covered, focusing on those derivatives that exist naturally in foods or are used as food additives. Chemical reactions emphasize those that have an impact on food quality and occur under processing and storage conditions. Coverage includes: how chemical and physical properties of sugars and polysaccharides affect the functional properties of foods; taste properties and non-enzymic browning reactions; the nutritional roles of carbohydrates from a food chemist's perspective; basic principles, advantages, and limitations of selected carbohydrate analytical methods. An appendix includes descriptions of proven laboratory exercises and demonstrations. Applications are emphasized, and anecdotal examples and case studies are presented. Laboratory units, homework exercises, and lecture demonstrations are included in the appendix. In addition to a complete list of cited references, a listing of key references is included with brief annotations describing their important features.

Students and professionals alike will benefit from this latest addition to the IFT Press book series. In Food Carbohydrate Chemistry, upper undergraduate and graduate students will find a clear explanation of how basic principles of carbohydrate chemistry can account for and predict functional properties such as sweetness, browning potential, and solubility properties. Professionals working in product development and technical sales will value Food Carbohydrate Chemistry as a needed resource to help them understand the functionality of carbohydrate ingredients. And persons in research and quality assurance will rely upon Food Carbohydrate Chemistry for understanding the principles of carbohydrate analytical methods and the physical and chemical properties of sugars and polysaccharides.

Many naturally occurring compounds from foods such as rice, vegetables, fruits, and animal products possess properties that help to slow disease progression, inhibit pathophysiological mechanisms, or suppress activities of pathogenic molecules. Proteins and peptides play significant roles in such activities and are gaining importance as nutraceuticals that benefit numerous aspects of health and nutrition. Bioactive Food Proteins and Peptides: Applications in Human Health provides a human health perspective on food-derived proteins and peptides. It describes the potential for large-scale production with advances in technology and proposes challenges and opportunities for the future of health, nutrition, medicine, and the biosciences.

The book begins by addressing properties related to chemistry and bioactivity. It examines proteins and peptides as allergens, antihypertensive agents, antimicrobials, antioxidants, and anticancer agents. It also discusses findings on the bioavailability and toxicity of food-derived peptides and intestinal functions.

Next, the contributors present information on therapeutic peptides. They discuss recent developments in proteomics, bioavailability, and opportunities for designing future peptide-based foods.

Providing a comprehensive review of bioactive proteins and peptides obtained from food sources, the book brings together the most up-to-date and essential information from eminent researchers from all over the world. Academics, food scientists and technologists, nutritionists, biochemists, persons in industry, and government researchers and regulators will find this book to be an essential resource for new data and developments.

Food proteins and bioactive peptides play a vital role in the growth and development of the body’s structural integrity and regulation, as well as having a variety of other functional properties. Land animal-derived food proteins such as collagen and gelatine carry risks of contamination (such as BSE). Marine-derived proteins, which can provide equivalents to collagen and gelatin without the associated risks, are becoming more popular among consumers because of their numerous health beneficial effects. Most marine-derived bioactive peptides are currently underutilized. While fish and shellfish are perhaps the most obvious sources of such proteins and peptides, there is also the potential for further development of proteins and peptides from sources like algae, sea cucumber and molluscs. Marine-derived proteins and peptides also have potential uses in novel products, with the possibility of wide commercialization in the food, beverage, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries, as well as in other fields such as photography, textiles, leather, electronics, medicine and biotechnology.

Marine Proteins and Peptides: Biological Activities and Applications presents an overview of the current status, future industrial perspectives and commercial trends of bioactive marine-derived proteins and peptides. Many of the industrial perspectives are drawn from the food industry, but the book also refers to the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries. There have recently been significant advances in isolating functional ingredients from marine bio-resources and seafood by-products for use in these industries, but little has been published, creating a knowledge gap, particularly with regard to the isolation and purification processes. This book is the first to fill that gap.

Marine Proteins and Peptides: Biological Activities and Applications is a valuable resource for researchers in marine biochemistry field as well as food industry managers interested in exploring novel techniques and knowledge on alternative food protein sources. It will become a standard reference book for researchers involved in developing marine bio-resources and seafood by-products for novel nutraceutical, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical applications. It will also appeal to managers and product developers in the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries, particularly those looking to use marine-derived proteins and peptides as substitutes or replacements for unfashionable or outdated food components.

Traditionally a source of nutrition, proteins are also added to foods for their ability to form gels and stabilise emulsions, among other properties. The range of specialised protein ingredients used in foods is increasing. Handbook of food proteins provides an authoritative overview of the characteristics, functionalities and applications of different proteins of importance to the food industry in one convenient volume.

The introductory chapter provides an overview of proteins and their uses in foods. The following chapters each focus on a particular protein ingredient or group of ingredients covering their origins, production, properties and applications. The proteins discussed are caseins, whey proteins, gelatin and other meat-derived protein ingredients, seafood proteins, egg proteins, soy proteins, pea and other legume proteins, mycoprotein, wheat gluten, canola and other oilseed proteins, algal proteins and potato protein. A chapter on texturised vegetable proteins completes the volume. Innovative products and potential methods for improving nutrition and diet using these proteins are described.

With its distinguished editors and international team of expert contributors Handbook of food proteins is an invaluable reference tool for professionals using food protein ingredients for both food and other applications.An authoritative overview of the characteristics, functionalities and applications of different proteins of importance to the food industryChapters each focus on a particular protein ingredient or group of ingredientsInnovative products and potential methods for improving nutrition and diet using proteins is also described
The food industry has utilized automated control systems for over a quarter of a century. However, the past decade has seen an increase in the use of more sophisticated software-driven, on-line control systems, especially in thermal processing unit operations. As these software-driven control systems have become more complex, the need to validate their operation has become more important. In addition to validating new control systems, some food companies have undertaken the more difficult task of validating legacy control systems that have been operating for a number of years on retorts or aseptic systems.

Thermal Processing: Control and Automation presents an overview of various facets of thermal processing and packaging from industry, academic, and government representatives. The book contains information that will be valuable not only to a person interested in understanding the fundamental aspects of thermal processing (eg graduate students), but also to those involved in designing the processes (eg process specialists based in food manufacturing) and those who are involved in process filing with USDA or FDA. The book focuses on technical aspects, both from a thermal processing standpoint and from an automation and process control standpoint. Coverage includes established technologies such as retorting as well as emerging technologies such as continuous flow microwave processing. The book addresses both the theoretical and applied aspects of thermal processing, concluding with speculations on future trends and directions.

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