Non-market Entrepreneurship: Interdisciplinary Approaches

Edward Elgar Publishing
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Non-market entrepreneurship' consists of all forms of entrepreneurship not being undertaken solely for purposes of profit maximization or commercialization. This work builds a theoretical edifice within the field of entrepreneurship and helps to estab
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Additional Information

Publisher
Edward Elgar Publishing
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Published on
Jan 1, 2009
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Pages
264
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ISBN
9781848445154
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Entrepreneurship
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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MBA MEETS MAIN STREET

Finally, the positive economic news every businessperson is waiting to hear. Jack Garson says the long economic downturn will give way to a major buying spree by cash-rich companies—and they could be in the market to purchase your small or medium-sized business. It's the ultimate payday for everyone who wants to live the American dream, whether they're starting a business or already own one. Millions of dollars are on the table. But will you and your business be ready?

How to Build a Business and Sell it for Millions is a must-read for every business owner and would-be entrepreneur. In entertaining and elaborate detail, Garson outlines the vital moves your company needs to make to become an attractive acquisition by other firms:

· Do you have a competitive edge that sets you apart from your competition?

· Are both you and your company sustainable and able to outlast the bad times to become a success?

· Can you stop being a "Derek," the boss who suffers from "Founder's Dilemma," micromanaging everything big and small?

How to Build a Business and Sell it for Millions uses real life examples to explain how the goal of selling your company needs to be linked to every business decision you make: hiring, compensation, contracts, financial reporting and dozens of other areas often overlooked by busy entrepreneurs. While many business owners struggle to get to the next day, Garson has the inside scoop on achieving the opportunity of a lifetime— selling your company for vast riches.

In How to Build a Business and Sell It for Millions, MBA meets Main Street, with a combination of inspiration and invaluable practical advice.

Seizing opportunities, inventing new products, transforming markets--entrepreneurs are an important and well-documented part of the private sector landscape. Do they have counterparts in the public sphere? The authors argue that they do, and test their argument by focusing on agents of dynamic political change in suburbs across the United States, where much of the entrepreneurial activity in American politics occurs. The public entrepreneurs they identify are most often mayors, city managers, or individual citizens. These entrepreneurs develop innovative ideas and implement new service and tax arrangements where existing administrative practices and budgetary allocations prove inadequate to meet a range of problems, from economic development to the racial transition of neighborhoods. How do public entrepreneurs emerge? How much does the future of urban development depend on them? This book answers these questions, using data from over 1,000 local governments.

The emergence of public entrepreneurs depends on a set of familiar cost-benefit calculations. Like private sector risk-takers, public entrepreneurs exploit opportunities emerging from imperfect markets for public goods, from collective-action problems that impede private solutions, and from situations where information is costly and the supply of services is uneven. The authors augment their quantitative analysis with ten case studies and show that bottom-up change driven by politicians, public managers, and other local agents obeys regular and predictable rules.

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