More than Night: Film Noir in Its Contexts, Edition 2

Univ of California Press
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"Film noir" evokes memories of stylish, cynical, black-and-white movies from the 1940s and '50s—melodramas about private eyes, femmes fatales, criminal gangs, and lovers on the run. James Naremore's prize-winning book discusses these pictures, but also shows that the central term is more complex and paradoxical than we realize. It treats noir as a term in criticism, as an expression of artistic modernism, as a symptom of Hollywood censorship and politics, as a market strategy, as an evolving style, and as an idea that circulates through all the media. This new and expanded edition of More Than Night contains an additional chapter on film noir in the twenty-first century.
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About the author

James Naremore is Emeritus Chancellors' Professor of Communication and Culture, English, and Comparative Literature at Indiana University. His books include Acting in the Cinema, The Magic World of Orson Welles, The Films of Vincente Minnelli, and On Kubrick.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Univ of California Press
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Published on
Jan 14, 2008
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Pages
408
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ISBN
9780520934450
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Language
English
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Genres
Performing Arts / Film / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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