Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Classrooms: New Dilemmas for Teachers

Multilingual Matters
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A critical reality of contemporary education in a globalised world is the growing cultural, racial and linguistic diversity in schools and the issues involved in educating increasing numbers of students who are still learning the dominant language. This poses extraordinary challenges for second and foreign language teachers in many countries, where such students must engage with the mainstream curriculum in a new language. What do these increasingly plurilingual and multicultural classrooms look like? And how do language teachers address the challenges of such diverse classrooms? This book brings together a group of well-recognised language education scholars who present their research in a range of international settings. They focus on the key areas of pedagogy, language policy and curriculum and exemplify new research directions in the field.
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About the author

Jennifer Miller is a Senior Lecturer in the Faculty of Education at Monash University where she teaches postgraduate TESOL courses. Her research and publications are in the areas of language acquisition and identity, the sociocultural framing of language pedagogy, and teacherâ??s work. Her book, Audible Difference: ESL and social identity (Multilingual Matters, 2003) explores the politics of speaking and identity for immigrant students in Australian high schools. Her current research concerns low literacy refugee students in the high school mainstream, and preservice teachers from non-English speaking backgrounds.

Alex Kostogriz is Associate Professor in TESOL in the School of Education, Deakin University. He has published widely on issues of professional practice and ethics of English language educators, teacher professional identity and learning, transcultural literacy and pedagogy of Thirdspace. He has co-edited Dimensions of Professional Learning (2007), special issues of Mind, Culture & Activity and English Teaching: Practice & Critique on learning in multicultural conditions.

Margaret Gearon is a Senior Lecturer in the Faculty of Education at Monash University. She specialises in language teacher education at both preservice and inservice levels, curriculum and assessment in foreign and community (heritage) languages, and bilingual education. Her research interests are in immersion education, code-switching in the foreign language classroom, and how the knowledge and beliefs of preservice languages teachers are manifested in their classroom practices. She is currently project director for the design of a teacher training course for community languages teachers in Australia.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Multilingual Matters
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Published on
Oct 20, 2009
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Pages
272
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ISBN
9781847693792
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Multicultural Education
Language Arts & Disciplines / Linguistics / General
Language Arts & Disciplines / Study & Teaching
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / General
Social Science / Minority Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Filled with day-to-day literacy practices, this book will help elementary school teachers understand their role in dismantling the imbalance of privilege in literacy education. Chapters take readers into classrooms where they will see, hear, and feel decolonizing and humanizing culturally relevant pedagogies as students learn literacy and a critical stance through musical literacies, oral histories, heritage lessons, and building a critical consciousness. The authors also share strategies to help teachers examine their own educational spaces, start the school year in culturally relevant ways, build reciprocal relationships with families and communities, and teach within standards and testing mandates while challenging unjust systems. Practices are brought to life through students, families, and community members who voice the realities of pedagogical privilege and oppression and urge educators to take action for change.

“Teachers of every child must acknowledge that ‘we’ve been doing it your way long enough’—this is the brilliance of the book and the work that lies ahead for all who commit to choosing the culturally relevant classroom.”
—Valerie Kinloch, dean, University of Pittsburgh School of Education

“Captures the heart of culturally relevant teaching. It is impossible to read this book and return to the same old pedagogies and practices.”
—Nathaniel Bryan, Miami University

“This volume seamlessly embeds guidance for creating liberating pedagogical practices in order to transform schools for all students and teachers.”
—Gloria Boutte, University of South Carolina

This book is a comprehensive guide for literacy teacher educators and professional development trainers who teach and work in online settings. The authors provide tools, techniques, and resources for developing courses, workshops, and other online learning experiences, including blended/hybrid delivery formats that combine face-to-face meetings with online practices. Moving away from traditional discussions in which technology and delivery systems dominate the conversation, this book focuses on the literacy instructor with techniques for building effective learning communities. The authors outline the unique pedagogical challenges posed by online courses and offer guidance for making decisions about what tools to use for specific instructional purposes. More than simply a “how-to” book, this resource will encourage novice and experienced instructors to extend their thinking and enable online literacy teacher education to grow in productive ways.

Book Features:

Support for those teaching in many different roles, including program coordinators, professors, and adjuncts. A focus on pedagogical innovation as the key to success, with concrete examples of instructional and assessment practices. Connections to the IRA Standards for Reading Professionals and other national standards for teacher education. A companion website where online literacy teacher educators can communicate and share resources.

“Be prepared to experience a compelling journey. . . . This might very well be the book that inspires you, like me, to find a trusted colleague, take a few risks, and begin your own journey toward moving a literacy course or whole program online.”
—From the Foreword by Julie Coiro, University of Rhode Island


Lane W. Clarke is assistant professor and literacy concentration leader in the Education Department of the University of New England. Susan Watts-Taffe is associate professor and coordinator of the Reading Endorsement program at the University of Cincinnati.

Four undocumented Mexican American students, two great teachers, one robot-building contest . . . and a major motion picture

In 2004, four Latino teenagers arrived at the Marine Advanced Technology Education Robotics Competition at the University of California, Santa Barbara. They were born in Mexico but raised in Phoenix, Arizona, where they attended an underfunded public high school. No one had ever suggested to Oscar, Cristian, Luis, or Lorenzo that they might amount to much—but two inspiring science teachers had convinced these impoverished, undocumented kids from the desert who had never even seen the ocean that they should try to build an underwater robot.
And build a robot they did. Their robot wasn't pretty, especially compared to those of the competition. They were going up against some of the best collegiate engineers in the country, including a team from MIT backed by a $10,000 grant from ExxonMobil. The Phoenix teenagers had scraped together less than $1,000 and built their robot out of scavenged parts. This was never a level competition—and yet, against all odds . . . they won!
But this is just the beginning for these four, whose story—which became a key inspiration to the DREAMers movement—will go on to include first-generation college graduations, deportation, bean-picking in Mexico, and service in Afghanistan.
Joshua Davis's Spare Parts is a story about overcoming insurmountable odds and four young men who proved they were among the most patriotic and talented Americans in this country—even as the country tried to kick them out.
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