Prominent Indonesian Chinese: Biographical Sketches (4th edition)

Institute of Southeast Asian Studies
Free sample

Indonesia is the largest country in Southeast Asia where there is a significant number of ethnic Chinese, many of whom have played an important role. This book presents biographical sketches of about 530 prominent Indonesian Chinese, including businessmen, community leaders, politicians, religious leaders, artists, sportsmen/sportswomen, writers, journalists, academics, physicians, educators, and scientists. First published in 1972, it was revised and developed into the present format in 1978, and has since been revised several times. This is the fourth and most up-to-date version.

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About the author

Leo Suryadinata is currently Visiting Senior Fellow, ISEAS–Yusof Ishak Institute, and Professor (Adj.), S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Nanyang Technological University (NTU). 

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Additional Information

Publisher
Institute of Southeast Asian Studies
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Published on
Aug 19, 2015
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Pages
495
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ISBN
9789814620505
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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