Agile Processes in Software Engineering and Extreme Programming

Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing

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The XP conference series established in 2000 was the first conference dedicated to agile processes in software engineering. The idea of the conference is to offer a unique setting for advancing the state of the art in the research and practice of agile processes. This year’s conference was the ninth consecutive edition of this international event. The conference has grown to be the largest conference on agile software development outside North America. The XP conference enjoys being one of those conferences that truly brings practitioners and academics together. About 70% of XP participants come from industry and the number of academics has grown steadily over the years. XP is more of an experience rather than a regular conference. It offers several different ways to interact and strives to create a truly collaborative environment where new ideas and exciting findings can be presented and shared. For example, this year’s open space session, which was “a conference within a conference”, was larger than ever before. Agile software development is a unique phenomenon from several perspectives.
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Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
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Published on
Jun 10, 2008
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Pages
258
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ISBN
9783540682554
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Information Management
Business & Economics / Production & Operations Management
Business & Economics / Research & Development
Computers / Information Technology
Computers / Software Development & Engineering / General
Computers / Systems Architecture / General
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This content is DRM protected.
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The expectation for the future of the 21st century enterprise is complexity and agility. In this digital age, business processes are scattered not only throu- out the labyrinth of their own enterprises, but also across di?erent enterprises, and even beyond the national boundaries. An evidence of this is the gr- ing phenomenon of business process outsourcing. Increasing competition, higher customer demands, and emerging technologies require swift adaptation to the changes. To understand, design, and engineer a modern enterprise (or an enterprise network) and its interwoven business processes, an engineering and systematic approach based on sound and rigorous theories and methodologies is necessary. Along with that, a paradigmshift seems to be needed for addressing these issues adequately. An appealing candidate is to look at an enterprise and its business processes as a social system. In its social setting, an enterprise and its bu- ness processes represent actors with certain authorities and assigned roles, who assume certain responsibilities in order to provide a service to its environment. The need for this paradigm shift along with the complexity and agility of modern enterprises, gives inspiration for the emerging discipline of Enterprise Engineering. For the study of this socio-technical phenomenon, the prominent tools ofModeling andSimulation play a signi?cant role.Both (conceptual) m- eling and simulationare widely used for understanding,analyzing,andengine- ing an enterprise (its organization and business processes).
This book contains the best papers of the 9th International Conference on Enterprise Information Systems (ICEIS 2007), held in the city of Funchal, Madeira (Portugal), organized by the Institute for Systems and Technologies of Information, Control and Communication (INSTICC) and the University of Madeira, in collaboration with ACM/SIGMIS and AAAI. Furthermore, the conference was sponsored by the Por- guese Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT). ICEIS has become a major point of contact between research scientists, engineers and practitioners in the area of business applications of information systems. This year, five simultaneous tracks were held, covering different aspects related to ent- prise computing, including: “Databases and Information Systems Integration,” “Arti- cial Intelligence and Decision Support Systems,” “Information Systems Analysis and Specification,” “Software Agents and Internet Computing” and “Human–Computer Interaction”. All tracks focused on real-world applications and highlighted benefits of information systems and technology for industry and services, thus making a bridge between academia and enterprise. Following the success of 2006, ICEIS 2007 received 644 paper submissions from more than 40 countries. In all, 72 papers were published and presented as full papers, i.e., completed work (8 pages in proceedings / 30-min oral presentations), 198 papers, reflecting work-in-progress or position papers, were accepted for short presentation and another 131 for poster presentation.
Since its inception in 1968, software engineering has undergone numerous changes. In the early years, software development was organized using the waterfall model, where the focus of requirements engineering was on a frozen requirements document, which formed the basis of the subsequent design and implementation process. Since then, a lot has changed: software has to be developed faster, in larger and distributed teams, for pervasive as well as large-scale applications, with more flexibility, and with ongoing maintenance and quick release cycles.

What do these ongoing developments and changes imply for the future of requirements engineering and software design? Now is the time to rethink the role of requirements and design for software intensive systems in transportation, life sciences, banking, e-government and other areas. Past assumptions need to be questioned, research and education need to be rethought.

This book is based on the Design Requirements Workshop, held June 3-6, 2007, in Cleveland, OH, USA, where leading researchers met to assess the current state of affairs and define new directions. The papers included were carefully reviewed and selected to give an overview of the current state of the art as well as an outlook on probable future challenges and priorities. After a general introduction to the workshop and the related NSF-funded project, the contributions are organized in topical sections on fundamental concepts of design; evolution and the fluidity of design; quality and value-based requirements; requirements intertwining; and adapting requirements practices in different domains.

Software testing is traditionally seen as a difficult and time consuming activity that is hard to embed in the software development process. This book provides a different view. It explains to stakeholders how testing can add value to software development and doing business, and provides the tester with practical information.

TestGoal is not just another methodology. Several good testing methodologies exist. But, like any other profession, also testing encompasses more than the simple application of a methodology. After all, strict adherence to a specific methodology is no guarantee for success. Success stems from the mindset, enthusiasm, knowledge and skill of the tester. These factors determine whether a methodology is applied successfully and whether testing takes on a result-driven character. And that’s what TestGoal is about: a result-driven attitude, testing principles and expertise as fundament, and a hands-on six step plan to enable result driven testing.

Derk-Jan de Grood and his colleagues from Collis, an international software testing company, know about the main pitfalls in test projects from their extensive professional experience. TestGoal has emerged from the office floor and captures over a decade of best practice. TestGoal is made by professionals for professionals, and it combines the mindset, knowledge, and skills required to add value with testing and make software development more successful.

This book explains in a clear language how you can make testing result-driven. It explains why testing is important and describes all of the activities involved in testing. It is enriched with recognizable examples, practical tips and useful checklists. This makes it a "GO kit" that enables testers to immediately get started and add value to their organization.

Our world and our society are shaped and increasingly governed by software. Since software is so ubiquitous and embedded in nearly everything we are doing, we need to stay in control. We have to make sure that the systems and their software are running as we intend - or better. Software measurement is the discipline that assures that we stay in control.

In this volume, Ebert and Dumke provide a comprehensive introduction to software measurement. They detail knowledge and experiences about software measurement in an easily understood, hands-on presentation. Brief references are embedded from world-renown experts such as Alain Abran, Luigi Buglione, Manfred Bundschuh, David N. Card, Ton Dekkers, Robert L. Glass, David A. Gustafson, Marek Leszak, Peter Liggesmeyer, Andreas Schmietendorf, Harry Sneed, Charles Symons, Ruediger Zarnekow and Horst Zuse. Many examples and case studies are provided from Global 100 companies such as Alcatel-Lucent, Atos Origin, Axa, Bosch, Deloitte, Deutsche Telekom, Shell, Siemens and Vector Consulting.

This combination of methodologies and applications makes the book ideally suited for both professionals in the software industry and for scientists looking for benchmarks and experiences. Besides the many practical hints and checklists readers will also appreciate the large reference list, which includes links to metrics communities where project experiences are shared. Further information, continuously updated, can also be found on the Web site related to this book: http://metrics.cs.uni-magdeburg.de/.

Rather than deciding whether or not to get involved in global sourcing, many companies are facing decisions about whether or not to apply agile methods in their distributed projects. These companies are often motivated by the opportunities to solve the coordination and communication difficulties associated with global software development. Yet while agile principles prescribe close interaction and co-location, the very nature of distributed software development does not support these prerequisites. Šmite, Moe, and Ågerfalk structured the book into five parts. In “Motivation” the editors introduce the fundamentals of agile distributed software development and explain the rationale behind the application of agile practices in globally distributed software projects. “ Transition” describes implementation strategies, adoption of particular agile practices for distributed projects, and general concepts of agility. “Management” details practical implications for project planning, time management, and customer and subcontractor interaction. “Teams” discusses agile distributed team configuration, effective communication and knowledge transfer, and allocation of roles and responsibilities. Finally, in the “Epilogue” the editors summarize all contributions and present future trends for research and practice in agile distributed development. This book is primarily targeted at researchers, lecturers, and students in empirical software engineering, and at practitioners involved in globally distributed software projects. The contributions are based on sound empirical research and identify gaps and commonalities in both the existing state of the art and state of the practice. In addition, they also offer practical advice through many hints, checklists, and experience reports. Questions answered in this book include: What should companies expect from merging agile and distributed strategies? What are the stumbling blocks that prevent companies from realizing the benefits of the agile approach in distributed environments, and how can we recognize infeasible strategies and unfavorable circumstances? What helps managers cope with the challenges of implementing agile approaches in distributed software development projects? How can distributed teams survive the decisions taken by management and become efficient through the application of agile approaches?
“As projects get more complicated, managers stop learning from their - perience. It is important to understand how that happens and how to change it.... Fallible estimates: In software development, initial estimates for a project shape the trajectory of decisions that a manager makes over its life. For ex- ple, estimates of the productivity of the team members influence decisions about the size of the team, which in turn affect the team’s actual output. The trouble is that initial estimates usually turn out to be wrong. ” (Sengupta, 2008) This book aims directly to increase the awareness among managers and practitioners that estimation is as important as the work to be done in so- ware and systems development. You can manage what you can measure! Readers will find in this book a collection of lessons learned from the worldwide “metrics community,” which we have documented and enhanced with our own experiences in the field of software measurement and estimating. Our goal is to support our readers to harvest the benefits of estimating and - prove their software development processes. We present the 5 ISO/I- acknowledged Functional Sizing Methods with variants, experiences, counting rules, and case studies – and most importantly, illustrate through practical - amples how to use functional size measurement to produce realistic estimates. The book is written in a practical manner, especially for the busy practitioner community. It is aimed to be used as a manual and an assistant for everyday work.
The expectation for the future of the 21st century enterprise is complexity and agility. In this digital age, business processes are scattered not only throu- out the labyrinth of their own enterprises, but also across di?erent enterprises, and even beyond the national boundaries. An evidence of this is the gr- ing phenomenon of business process outsourcing. Increasing competition, higher customer demands, and emerging technologies require swift adaptation to the changes. To understand, design, and engineer a modern enterprise (or an enterprise network) and its interwoven business processes, an engineering and systematic approach based on sound and rigorous theories and methodologies is necessary. Along with that, a paradigmshift seems to be needed for addressing these issues adequately. An appealing candidate is to look at an enterprise and its business processes as a social system. In its social setting, an enterprise and its bu- ness processes represent actors with certain authorities and assigned roles, who assume certain responsibilities in order to provide a service to its environment. The need for this paradigm shift along with the complexity and agility of modern enterprises, gives inspiration for the emerging discipline of Enterprise Engineering. For the study of this socio-technical phenomenon, the prominent tools ofModeling andSimulation play a signi?cant role.Both (conceptual) m- eling and simulationare widely used for understanding,analyzing,andengine- ing an enterprise (its organization and business processes).
Accountability. Transparency. Responsibility. These are not words that are often applied to software development.

In this completely revised introduction to Extreme Programming (XP), Kent Beck describes how to improve your software development by integrating these highly desirable concepts into your daily development process.

The first edition of Extreme Programming Explained is a classic. It won awards for its then-radical ideas for improving small-team development, such as having developers write automated tests for their own code and having the whole team plan weekly. Much has changed in five years. This completely rewritten second edition expands the scope of XP to teams of any size by suggesting a program of continuous improvement based on:

Five core values consistent with excellence in software development Eleven principles for putting those values into action Thirteen primary and eleven corollary practices to help you push development past its current business and technical limitations

Whether you have a small team that is already closely aligned with your customers or a large team in a gigantic or multinational organization, you will find in these pages a wealth of ideas to challenge, inspire, and encourage you and your team members to substantially improve your software development.

You will discover how to:

Involve the whole team–XP style Increase technical collaboration through pair programming and continuous integration Reduce defects through developer testing Align business and technical decisions through weekly and quarterly planning Improve teamwork by setting up an informative, shared workspace

You will also find many other concrete ideas for improvement, all based on a philosophy that emphasizes simultaneously increasing the humanity and effectiveness of software development.

Every team can improve. Every team can begin improving today. Improvement is possible–beyond what we can currently imagine. Extreme Programming Explained, Second Edition, offers ideas to fuel your improvement for years to come.



This book is open access under a CC BY 4.0 license.

This book is intended primarily for practitioners who are facing the “softwareisation” of their business. It presents the Scaling Management Framework, a model based on collected experiences from companies that have already made the journey to give software a central role within the organization. The model is unique because it suggests a holistic method to analyze and plan your journey. It simply means that you can’t just focus solely on your products or services. You also have to look closely at your processes and your organization, the way you make decisions and get things done. Inevitably, these will have to change.

Software has changed the rules of the game. The world talks about the digitalization in industry and society – how the focus has shifted from producing tangible things towards software and services. This trend started many years ago, but is now affecting every company, whether it’s a software company or not. There are many companies that have already made a digitalization journey – and many are about to embark on this journey – like you. How do you transform your organization when software is becoming a critical part of your business?

This book comes with a map, a compass, and suggested journeys along with selected travel stories comprising best practices and lessons learned from past digitalization journeys. Use the map to find your way in the digitalization landscape, and use the compass to find the direction of your journey.

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