I Know This Much Is True: A Novel

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With his stunning debut novel, She's Come Undone, Wally Lamb won the adulation of critics and readers with his mesmerizing tale of one woman's painful yet triumphant journey of self-discovery. Now, this brilliantly talented writer returns with I Know This Much Is True, a heartbreaking and poignant multigenerational saga of the reproductive bonds of destruction and the powerful force of forgiveness. A masterpiece that breathtakingly tells a story of alienation and connection, power and abuse, devastation and renewal—this novel is a contemporary retelling of an ancient Hindu myth. A proud king must confront his demons to achieve salvation. Change yourself, the myth instructs, and you will inhabit a renovated world.
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4.8
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Additional Information

Publisher
Harper Collins
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Published on
Mar 17, 2009
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Pages
928
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ISBN
9780061745799
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Family Life / General
Fiction / Psychological
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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