Brooklyn Roots: A Tale of Pickles and Egg Creams

iUniverse
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Brooklyn Roots is the story of Estelle Breines experience growing up in Borough Park, but it will resonate with anyone who grew up there, or for that matter, in any other urban, ethnic neighborhood. She paints word pictures that take you back in time, evoking the scenes, scents and sensibilities of the old neighborhood.
Leslie Werstein Hann, writer/editor, HannWriting Inc.

Once stirred, those memories rolled out in bursts, demanding recording. A description of the neighborhood of her youth emerged: her fathers pharmacy, shops along the avenue, and the house with its magnificent purple irises peeking above a stone wall as tall as a four year old. A small garment is remembered in detail: a dolls dress made from an old pillowcase, using a needle encrusted by baked on grease from the stuffed chicken necks her grandmother prepared; this the woman who braided the authors hair so tightly as surrogate parent while her parents worked to provide for them all in an era emerging from the Great Depression. There was the school she attended when the war began, and the celebrations at its end, and the places she and her friends explored as they grew. Her recollections of the neighborhoods artifacts appear as she envisions pickles and egg creams. Each shop along the 13th Avenue of her memory is sustained in its original character, even the corsetiere and milliner of the past, stuck there in time.

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About the author

Raised as an only child, Brooklyn had a strong influence on the author’s life. She was a child between eras, growing up before women were viewed for their full potential, in a family who imbued her with a respect for education and a sense of independence she drew upon to strengthen her love for an expanding family: her husband of 54 years, three children, and nine grandchildren. Her career as an occupational therapist, businesswoman and educator drew from these influences. Living on a farm in western NJ, Dr. Breines now takes time to write, having produced several books, chapters and an ongoing column published since 1994. Brooklyn Roots is the first book she has written about herself and her family.

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Additional Information

Publisher
iUniverse
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Published on
Feb 7, 2011
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Pages
136
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ISBN
9781450264211
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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“Every man dies. Not every man really lives.”

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A decade later, while on a trip to Scotland, Randall is introduced to an unfamiliar statue with an inscription that bears his last name. After hearing the first fragments of the Scottish hero’s tale, Randall recognizes the seeds of a truly great story.

His William Wallace and his band of warriors forever changed the way we view love, war, and freedom. Living the Braveheart Life is a personal narrative of how an epic feature film came to life and breathed life into its author. It is the kind of book that will change the way we approach our internal battles, creative or personal.

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The description 'definitive' is too easily used, but Donald Rayfield's biography of Chekhov merits it unhesitatingly. To quote no less an authority than Michael Frayn:

'With question the definitive biography of Chekhov, and likely to remain so for a very long time to come. Donald Rayfield starts with the huge advantage of much new material that was prudishly suppressed under the Soviet regime, or tactfully ignored by scholars. But his mastery of all the evidence, both old and new - a massive archive - is magisterial, his background knowledge of the period is huge; his Russian is sensitive to every colloquial nuance of the day, and his tone is sure. He captures a likeness of the notoriously elusive Chekhov which at last begins to seem recognisably human - and even more extraordinary.'

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