Mathematics for the Life Sciences

Princeton University Press
3
Free sample

The life sciences deal with a vast array of problems at different spatial, temporal, and organizational scales. The mathematics necessary to describe, model, and analyze these problems is similarly diverse, incorporating quantitative techniques that are rarely taught in standard undergraduate courses. This textbook provides an accessible introduction to these critical mathematical concepts, linking them to biological observation and theory while also presenting the computational tools needed to address problems not readily investigated using mathematics alone.

Proven in the classroom and requiring only a background in high school math, Mathematics for the Life Sciences doesn't just focus on calculus as do most other textbooks on the subject. It covers deterministic methods and those that incorporate uncertainty, problems in discrete and continuous time, probability, graphing and data analysis, matrix modeling, difference equations, differential equations, and much more. The book uses MATLAB throughout, explaining how to use it, write code, and connect models to data in examples chosen from across the life sciences.

  • Provides undergraduate life science students with a succinct overview of major mathematical concepts that are essential for modern biology
  • Covers all the major quantitative concepts that national reports have identified as the ideal components of an entry-level course for life science students
  • Provides good background for the MCAT, which now includes data-based and statistical reasoning
  • Explicitly links data and math modeling
  • Includes end-of-chapter homework problems, end-of-unit student projects, and select answers to homework problems
  • Uses MATLAB throughout, and MATLAB m-files with an R supplement are available online
  • Prepares students to read with comprehension the growing quantitative literature across the life sciences
  • A solutions manual for professors and an illustration package is available
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About the author

Erin N. Bodine is assistant professor of mathematics at Rhodes College. Suzanne Lenhart is Chancellor's Professor of Mathematics at the University of Tennessee. Louis J. Gross is Distinguished Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Mathematics at the University of Tennessee.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Princeton University Press
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Published on
Aug 17, 2014
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Pages
640
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ISBN
9781400852772
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Language
English
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Genres
Mathematics / Applied
Medical / General
Science / Biotechnology
Science / Life Sciences / Biology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Ecologists and evolutionary biologists today need enough mathematical training to be able to assess the power and limits of biological models and to develop theories and models themselves. This innovative book will be an indispensable guide to the world of mathematical models for the next generation of biologists.


A how-to guide for developing new mathematical models in biology
Provides step-by-step recipes for constructing and analyzing models
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Questions at the end of every chapter
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Recognizing the important advances in bioinformatices since their last edition, Buehler and Rashidi have produced a completely revised and updated version of their pioneering work. To allow scientists to utilize significant databases from around the world, the authors consider some fresh approaches to data analysis while identifying computing techniques that will help them manage the massive flow of information their science requires.

New to the second edition:

Provides a more detailed view of the field while continuing to focus on the global concept approach that popularized the first edition. Offers the latest approaches to data analysis Introduces recent developments in genomics, microarrays, proteomics, genome mapping, and more. Adds two new sections offering insights from other experts in bioinformatics.

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