Worlding Cities

Studies in Urban and Social Change

Book 42
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Worlding Cities is the first serious examination of Asian urbanism to highlight the connections between different Asian models and practices of urbanization. It includes important contributions from a respected group of scholars across a range of generations, disciplines, and sites of study.
  • Describes the new theoretical framework of ‘worlding’
  • Substantially expands and updates the themes of capital and culture
  • Includes a unique collection of authors across generations, disciplines, and sites of study
  • Demonstrates how references to Asian power, success, and hegemony make possible urban development and limit urban politics
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About the author

Ananya Roy is Professor of City and Regional Planning and Co-Director of Global Metropolitan Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Her most recent book is Poverty Capital: Microfinance and the Making of Development (2010).

Aihwa Ong is Professor of Socio-cultural Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley. Her most recent publications are Privatizing China, Socialism from Afar (2008) and Asian Biotech: Ethics and Communities of Fate (2010).

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Additional Information

Publisher
John Wiley & Sons
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Published on
Jun 9, 2011
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Pages
376
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ISBN
9781444346787
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Language
English
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Genres
Architecture / Urban & Land Use Planning
Science / Earth Sciences / Geography
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Virtually every school of public health teaches a global health course, yet the major textbooks provide little on the actual practice of international health. This new book comprises a series of vivid first person accounts in which physicians, epidemiologists, health workers, and public health professionals from around the world present the critical dilemmas and challenges facing the field. Aimed primarily at medical and public health students and professionals, this book will be a much-needed addition to the existing literature. Related fields, such as development and urban studies, will find this book an engaging introduction to the core issues of international development. International health practitioners, national and local policymakers, foundations officers, and other related professionals will also find it an invaluable compendium. The Practice of International Health is a beautifully conceived and beautifully written book. It offers an inspiring example of what may be accomplished when scholars with field experience break free of rigid disciplinary boundaries in order to examine key problems in international health. This case-based approach is precisely the one that will allow us to build a new field based on broad understandings of these problems and on the solutions that might follow. The need for and vibrant potential of such a focus on practice that resonates in every page of this book signals its profound relevance to students and teachers of public health, and, one hopes, to policy makers and funders. From the Foreward by Paul Farmer
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