Out of Work: Unemployment and Government in Twentieth-Century America

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Redefining the way we think about unemployment in America today, Out of Work offers devastating evidence that the major cause of high unemployment in the United States is the government itself.

An Independent Institute Book

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About the author

Richard K. Vedder is Distinguished Professor of Economics and Faculty Associate at the Contemporary History Institute of Ohio University, and is the author of numerous books and articles.

Lowell E. Galloway is Distinguished Professor of Economics at Ohio University and a former staff economist on the Joint Economic Committee of the United States Congress.

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Additional Information

Publisher
NYU Press
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Published on
Jul 1, 1997
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Pages
408
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ISBN
9780814788332
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Government & Business
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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