Adventures in Sustainable Urbanism

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Opens up new ways of thinking about and debating the consequences of sustainable urbanism as it moves from planning to practice.


In the context of urban sustainable development, the “details” of sustainability’s current expressions perpetuate environmental injustice, untenable growth, and the destruction of functioning ecosystems. In response to this state of affairs, Adventures in Sustainable Urbanism aims to prompt new debates about the consequences of sustainable urbanism as it moves from planning to practice. Contributors explore policy, practice, and experience from cities around the world, including Calgary, Christchurch, Dortmund, Vancouver, and others. Written by scholars who live in these cities, chapters offer empirically rich descriptions for opening up new lines of thinking, theorizing, and debate about the sustainable city and its actual material expressions in place. By examining the sustainable city through various analytical framings, contributors urge readers to move from viewing the sustainable city as something everyone can agree on, to a highly politicized and contested process. Additional resources are provided for readers who may wish to extend their own research into a city or theme.


“This is a very compelling book that clearly conveys the multiple and contested meanings and practices of sustainable urban development. In the end, the reader is left to consider not only the plurality of understandings of sustainability—clearly not an innocent or neutral concept—but the varied interests sustainability may serve. This book represents a unique contribution to the field.” — Byron Miller, coeditor of The Routledge Handbook on Spaces of Urban Politics

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About the author

Robert Krueger is Associate Professor of Geography at Worcester Polytechnic Institute and the coeditor (with David Gibbs) of The Sustainable Development Paradox: Urban Political Economy in the United States and Europe

Tim Freytag is Professor of Human Geography at the University of Freiburg, Germany. 

Samuel Mössner is Professor for Planning and Sustainability at the University of Münster, Germany.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
Nov 1, 2019
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Pages
278
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ISBN
9781438476506
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Public Policy / City Planning & Urban Development
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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This handbook contributes with new evidence and new insights to the on-going debate on the de-colonization of knowledge on urban planning in Africa.

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New York Times Bestseller • Notable Book of the Year • Editors' Choice Selection
One of Bill Gates’ “Amazing Books” of the Year
One of Publishers Weekly’s 10 Best Books of the Year
Longlisted for the National Book Award for Nonfiction
An NPR Best Book of the Year
Winner of the Hillman Prize for Nonfiction
Gold Winner • California Book Award (Nonfiction)
Finalist • Los Angeles Times Book Prize (History)
Finalist • Brooklyn Public Library Literary Prize

This “powerful and disturbing history” exposes how American governments deliberately imposed racial segregation on metropolitan areas nationwide (New York Times Book Review).

 

Widely heralded as a “masterful” (Washington Post) and “essential” (Slate) history of the modern American metropolis, Richard Rothstein’s The Color of Law offers “the most forceful argument ever published on how federal, state, and local governments gave rise to and reinforced neighborhood segregation” (William Julius Wilson). Exploding the myth of de facto segregation arising from private prejudice or the unintended consequences of economic forces, Rothstein describes how the American government systematically imposed residential segregation: with undisguised racial zoning; public housing that purposefully segregated previously mixed communities; subsidies for builders to create whites-only suburbs; tax exemptions for institutions that enforced segregation; and support for violent resistance to African Americans in white neighborhoods. A groundbreaking, “virtually indispensable” study that has already transformed our understanding of twentieth-century urban history (Chicago Daily Observer), The Color of Law forces us to face the obligation to remedy our unconstitutional past.
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