The Human Face of Global Mobility

Comparative Urban and Community Research

Book 8
Transaction Publishers
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Alongside flows of trade and capital, the free movement of professionals, technical personnel, and students is seen as a key aspect of globalization. Yet not much detailed empirical research has been completed about the trajectories and experiences of these highly skilled or highly educated international migrants. What little is known about these forms of "global mobility," and the politics that surround them, contrasts with the abundant theories and accounts of other types of international migration--such as low income economic migration from less developed to core countries in the international political economy. Drawing on the work of a long-standing discussion group at the Center for Comparative and Global Research of UCLA's International Institute, this collection bridges conventional methodological divides, bringing together political scientists, sociologists, demographers, and ethnographers. It explores the reality behind assumptions about these new global migration trends. It challenges widely held views about the elite characteristics of these migrants, the costs and consequences of the brain drain said to follow from the migration of skilled workers, the determinants of national policies on high skilled migrants, and the presumed "effortlessness" of professional mobility in an integrating world. The volume also sheds new light on international student migration, the politics of temporary, non-immigrant workers in the United States, new international forms of regulating movement, and the realities of the everyday lives of multinational employees in the world's transnational cities. Key differences between the regional contexts of this migration in Europe, North America, and the Asia-Pacific are also emphasized. Michael Peter Smith is professor of community studies at the University of California, Davis. He has published extensively on urban theory, globalization, and transnationalism including Transnationalism from Below and City and Nation (both available through Transaction) and Transnational Urbanism. Adrian Favell is associate professor of sociology at UCLA. He is the author of Philosophies of Integration, and has published widely on migration in Europe, citizenship, the integration of immigrants, and on social theory.
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Publisher
Transaction Publishers
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Pages
314
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ISBN
9781412825634
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Labor
Social Science / Emigration & Immigration
Social Science / Sociology / Rural
Social Science / Sociology / Urban
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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J. D. Vance
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

"A riveting book."—The Wall Street Journal

"Essential reading."—David Brooks, New York Times

From a former marine and Yale Law School graduate, a powerful account of growing up in a poor Rust Belt town that offers a broader, probing look at the struggles of America’s white working class

Hillbilly Elegy is a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisis—that of white working-class Americans. The decline of this group, a demographic of our country that has been slowly disintegrating over forty years, has been reported on with growing frequency and alarm, but has never before been written about as searingly from the inside. J. D. Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hung around your neck.

The Vance family story begins hopefully in postwar America. J. D.’s grandparents were “dirt poor and in love,” and moved north from Kentucky’s Appalachia region to Ohio in the hopes of escaping the dreadful poverty around them. They raised a middle-class family, and eventually their grandchild (the author) would graduate from Yale Law School, a conventional marker of their success in achieving generational upward mobility.

But as the family saga of Hillbilly Elegy plays out, we learn that this is only the short, superficial version. Vance’s grandparents, aunt, uncle, sister, and, most of all, his mother, struggled profoundly with the demands of their new middle-class life, and were never able to fully escape the legacy of abuse, alcoholism, poverty, and trauma so characteristic of their part of America. Vance piercingly shows how he himself still carries around the demons of their chaotic family history.

A deeply moving memoir with its share of humor and vividly colorful figures, Hillbilly Elegy is the story of how upward mobility really feels. And it is an urgent and troubling meditation on the loss of the American dream for a large segment of this country.

Michael Peter Smith
Expansion of transnational capital and mass media to even the remotest of places has provoked a spate of discourse on transnationalism. A core theme hi this debate is the penetration of national cultures and political systems by global and local driving forces. The nation-state is seen as weakened by transnational capital, global media, and emergent supranational political institutions. It also faces the decentering local resistances of the informal economy, ethnic nationalism, and grass-roots activism. Transnationalism From Below brings together a rich combination of theoretical and grounded studies of transnational processes and practices, discussing both their positive and negative aspects.

The editors examine the scope and limits of transnationalism. The volume is divided into four parts: "Theorizing Transnationalism"; "Transnational Economic and Political Agency"; "Constructing Transnational Localities"; and "Transnational Practices and Cultural Reinscription." Contriburtors include Andre C. Drainville, Josephine Smart, Alan Smart, Minna Nyberg S0rensen, George Fouron, Nina Glick Schiller, Luin Goldring, Sarah J. Mahler, Linda Miller Matthei, Louisa Schein, David A. Smith, and Robert C. Smith. Moving easily between micro and macro analyses, this book expands the boundaries of the current scholarship on transnationalism, locates new forms of transnational agency, and poses provocative questions that challenge prevailing interpretations of globalization. Transnationalism From Below is a pioneering collection that will make a significant addition to the libraries of anthropologists, sociologists, international relations specialists, urban planners, political scientists, and policymakers.

Michael Peter Smith
Research in the field of clinical neuropsychology has greatly advanced understanding of the complex relationships between brain functions and human behavior. This edited collection, originally published in the early days of this dynamic field, draws from the findings of clinical study, animal experimentation, and developmental observation to clarify the relationships between brain and behavior. The result is a report on the state of knowledge at that time, and a barometer of how far the field has come.

The book's contributors include some of the leading figures in the field of human and developmental neuropsychology. They present comprehensive reviews of salient topics on which they themselves have done important investigative work. An introduction by Klaus Poeck describes the historical evolution of clinical neuropsychology and discusses the status of the field from both substantive and methodological standpoints. George Ettlinger and Colin Blakemore describe understanding of inter-hemispheric relations as demonstrated by studies in animals and man. Sidney Weinstein discusses the phenomenon of the "phantom" in patients with amputated body parts and its implications for the concept of body image.

Norman Geschwind, who was instrumental in reviving interest in the anatomical approach to aphasia, focuses on some unsolved anatomical problems and suggests needed clinical and experimental study. Arthur L. Benton outlines questions concerning constructional apraxia. Josephine Semmes offers a brilliant reformulation on whether there are discrete basic types of somatosensory function. Luigi Vignolo presents a masterful analysis of the concept of auditory agnosia and describes his own research in this area. Concentrating on a few important problem areas, each of which is intensively probed, this book offers valuable insight into how research advances understanding of the neuroanatomical bases of behavior.

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