God’s Illusion Machine: The Vedic Alternative to Richard Dawkins’s God Delusion

Xlibris Corporation
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In the tidal wave of intellectual argument that followed the 2006 release of Richard Dawkins’s God Delusion book, a fierce debate has raged between atheism and religion over the existence of God, leaving the world’s scientists and laymen largely undecided in their opinion. God’s Illusion Machine presents a fascinating alternative to a debate that has largely been argued within the framework of Christian versus science concepts. Drawing upon the world’s oldest body of knowledge (the Vedas), the author describes the massive illusion to which we are all subjected as we mistakenly believe ourselves to be physical creations of the material world. In God’s Illusion Machine, the material world is gradually exposed as the ultimate virtual reality machine for wayward souls who prefer a self-centred, rather than a God-centred, existence. In contrast to Richard Dawkins’s assertion that the religious are suffering a delusion for believing in God, the author argues that both the atheists and the religious are under the spell of God’s deluding energy called Mäyä, which acts in reciprocation with a soul’s desire to be in illusion within the physical realm.

By applying the profound spiritual insights of Vedic knowledge along with a healthy dose of common sense and good humour, God’s Illusion Machine is an enthralling exposé of the deceptive nature of the material world and the false claims of materialists regarding the nature of life and love. It is a triumph of spirituality over both atheistic materialism and religious dogmatism.

God’s Illusion Machine is a work of major importance realigning Western religion, philosophy, and science with eternal spiritual truths, an enlightening read for both the atheist and the religious, bringing spiritual certainty and true love to bewildered souls in troubled times. For atheists who like a good argument, for the religious who are stuck for a reply to Richard Dawkins, for fans of fantasy and sci-fi where forces of light and illusion contend in battle, and for you, the reader, whatever your disposition, this book will forever change your outlook on life and its meaning. As the rising sun disperses the darkness of night, so in the presence of Krishna (The Absolute Truth), mäyä (illusion) cannot stand.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Xlibris Corporation
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Published on
Dec 30, 2013
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Pages
532
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ISBN
9781493121519
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Language
English
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Genres
Philosophy / Movements / Existentialism
Philosophy / Religious
Religion / Spirituality
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Amanda Gefter
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From the Hardcover edition.
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