Terror, Violence and the Impulse to Destroy: Perspectives from Analytical Psychology

Free sample

These papers address the process of terror as it confronts us in international situations and in outbreaks of violence in homes and schools. The thirteen contributors, seasoned Jungian analysts and psychotherapists, have often faced the reality of undermining destructiveness in their work with clients. Here they offer their theoretical and therapeutic insights, drawing from their experience of the psyche’s healing resources to identify the consciousness we need if we are to survive and reverse the contagion of hostility. 

This book provides an opportunity to learn what can inform the human spirit to prevail over the forces that threaten its integrity and compassion.

Contents:

John Beebe Preface

Clarissa Pinkola Estés Explaining Evil

Jacqueline Gerson Kidnapping: Latin America’s Terror

Judith Hecker A View from the Islamic Side: Terror, Violence, and Transformation 

in the Life of an Eleventh Century Muslim

John Dourley Archetypal Hatred as Social Bond: Strategies for its Dissolution

Beverley Zabriskie Response to John Dourley

Mary Dougherty Escape/No Escape: The Persistence of Terror in 

the Lives of Two Women

Thomas Singer Cultural Complexes and Archetypal Defenses of the Group Spirit

Samuel L. Kimbles Cultural Complexes and Collective Shadow Processes 

Sherry Salman Blood Payments 

Arthur D. Colman Music and the Psychology of Pacifism: Benjamin Britten’s War Requiem

Arlene TePaske Landau The Impulse to Destroy in Thomas Hardy’s Jude the Obscure

Naomi Ruth Lowinsky Wrestling with God: From the Book of Job to the Poets of the Shoah

Brian Skea Jung, Spielrein, and Nash: Three Beautiful Minds Confronting the Impulse 

to Love or to Destroy in the Creative Process


Read more
Collapse
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Daimon
Read more
Collapse
Pages
325
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9783856309183
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
Political Science / Terrorism
Psychology / Movements / Jungian
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Collapse
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Research in Analytical Psychology: Empirical Research provides an original overview of empirical research in Analytical Psychology, focusing on quantitative and qualitative methods. This unique collection of chapters from an international range of contributors covers all the major concepts of Analytical Psychology and provides a strong empirical foundation.

The book covers a wide range of concepts and fields, and is presented in five parts. Part I, Epistemological Foundations, looks at psychological empiricism and naturalism. Part II, Fundamental Concepts of Analytical Psychology, presents chapters on complexes, archetypes, dream interpretation, and image. Part III, Trauma, addresses neuroscience, dreams and infant observation research. Part IV, Psychotherapy and Psychotherapeutic Methods examines sandplay, picture interpretation, quality management and training. Finally, Part V, Synchronicity, contains chapters concerning the experience of psychophysical correlations and synchronistic experiences in psychotherapy. Each chapter provides an overview of research in the field and closes with general conclusions, and the book as a whole will enable practitioners to evaluate the empirical status of their concepts and methods and, where necessary, update them. It also presents the necessary material for a re-evaluation of the status of Analytical Psychology within the broader academic field, supporting a move back into the heart of current debates in psychology and psychotherapy.

This book will be essential reading for analytical psychologists in practice and in training, academics and students of Analytical Psychology and post-Jungian ideas, and academics and students of other disciplines seeking to integrate methods from Analytical Psychology into their research. It is complemented by its companion volume, Research in Analytical Psychology: Applications from Scientific, Historical, and Cross-Cultural Research.

A measure of our need for integrity, John Beebe writes, is that "we rarely allow ourselves an examination of the concept itself. To do so would betray an unspoken philosophic, poetic, and psychological rule of our culture: not to disturb the mystery of what we desire most."

In this sensitive, broadly ranging, and surprisingly detailed work, Beebe reveals much about the nature of integrity while honoring its central mystery. In the process he clarifies not only the importance, but the psychological meaning of this quality. He presents a way of working in psychotherapeutic relationships not only with integrity, but on integrity.

Starting with a careful examination of integritas, a word that appears to have been introduced by Cicero, Beebe traces the evolution of the concept from a moral and theological notion to a psychological one. He explores the Eastern understanding of integrity, as well, basing his discussion on pre-Confucian manuscripts of the Tao Te Ching.

Viewing anxiety and shame as functions of integrity, he shows the contributions depth psychology can make to integrity's development. He summons the Puritan Forefather as a repressed archetype of integrity, then looks at the ways sex difference and our resulting notions of gender have colored our culture's experience and expression of integrity. He goes beyond C. G. Jung's concept of the anima/feminine principle to present a masculine as well as feminine access to integration and wholeness for men and women. Pointing to the all-important role of the psychological shadow in defining the limits of any moral standpoint, he helps us to locate integrity as the part of a person that is consistent in accepting the ever-shifting wholeness of the total personality.

Drawing on his own years of experience as a psychotherapist, Beebe shows how the holding environment of psychotherapy can use delight and rage, dreams and transference to reveal and foster individual integrity. A fairy tale of healing from the Grimm Brothers draws together the strands of his argument in a powerful call for integrity to be not only the goal but the means of therapy. Integrity in Depth is a ground-breaking work that moves the reader to think in a new way about the psychological basis of moral wholeness.

John Beebe is a psychiatrist and practicing Jungian analyst in San Francisco. In addition to his private practice, he is a clinical assistant professor at the University of California Medical School. He serves as U.S. editor of the Journal of Analytical Psychology, is the founding editor of the San Francisco Jung Institute Library Journal, and has produced three earlier books as editor and co-author.

Man and His Symbols owes its existence to one of Jung's own dreams. The great psychologist dreamed that his work was understood by a wide public, rather than just by psychiatrists, and therefore he agreed to write and edit this fascinating book. Here, Jung examines the full world of the unconscious, whose language he believed to be the symbols constantly revealed in dreams. Convinced that dreams offer practical advice, sent from the unconscious to the conscious self, Jung felt that self-understanding would lead to a full and productive life. Thus, the reader will gain new insights into himself from this thoughtful volume, which also illustrates symbols throughout history. Completed just before his death by Jung and his associates, it is clearly addressed to the general reader.

Praise for Man and His Symbols

“This book, which was the last piece of work undertaken by Jung before his death in 1961, provides a unique opportunity to assess his contribution to the life and thought of our time, for it was also his firsat attempt to present his life-work in psychology to a non-technical public. . . . What emerges with great clarity from the book is that Jung has done immense service both to psychology as a science and to our general understanding of man in society, by insisting that imaginative life must be taken seriously in its own right, as the most distinctive characteristic of human beings.”—Guardian

“Straighforward to read and rich in suggestion.”—John Barkham, Saturday Review Syndicate

“This book will be a resounding success for those who read it.”—Galveston News-Tribune

“A magnificent achievement.”—Main Currents

“Factual and revealing.”—Atlanta Times
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.