Bertolt Brecht Journals, 1934-55

Bloomsbury Publishing
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"Those who dismiss Brecht as a yea-sayer to Stalinism are advised to read these journals and moderate their opinion." (Paul Bailey, Weekend Telegraph)



Brecht's "Work Journals" cover the period from 1938 to 1955, the years of exile in Denmark, Sweden, Finland and America, and his return via Switzerland to East Berlin. His criticisms of the work of other writers and intellectuals are perceptive and polemic, and the accounts of his own writing practice provide insight into the creation of his dramatic works of the period, the development of his political thinking and his theories about epic theatre. Also integrated into the journals are Brecht's immediate reactions to and commentary upon the events of the period: his political exile's view of the course of World War II and his account of the House Un-American Activities committee.

"A marvellous, motley collage of political ideas, domestic detail, artistic debate, poems, photographs and cuttings from newspapers and magazines, assembled, undoubtedly for posterity by one of the great writers of the century" (New Statesman and Society)


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Additional Information

Publisher
Bloomsbury Publishing
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Published on
Jul 14, 2016
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Pages
576
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ISBN
9781408162002
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / General
Performing Arts / Theater / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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