Nights in Tents: On the Front Lines of the Occupy Movement

Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
Free sample

From an acclaimed musician comes an inside look at the Occupy Movement—one of the most controversial and influential progressive movements of our time.
 
In 2011, internationally recognized singer/songwriter Laura Love put her career—and her comfortable life—on hold to join the Occupy Movement. Both profoundly moving and hysterically funny, Nights in Tents is her memoir about the year she spent immersed in the political culture of Occupy, and living in chaotic tent encampments from Wall Street to Oakland.
 
Traveling through the United States, Love pitched her tent on city center concrete plazas; she helped shut down the Port of Oakland; she took over a Bank of America in San Francisco; and was teargassed, arrested, and jailed. All the while, she formed close bonds with the disparate characters who make up the 99 percent.
 
Nights in Tents is an engaging account of an activist on the front lines, underscoring the importance of this moment in history and the crucial decisions in front of us.
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About the author

Laura Love is an acclaimed African American singer/songwriter who has released twelve CDs since 1990 and has toured internationally over the past twenty-five years. She grew up in Lincoln, Nebraska, in a chaotic household with her sister and an unstable mother. Eventually, she fled to Seattle, where she built an independent music career, catching the attention of industry giant Universal Records. Laura released two praised CDs with Universal before returning to her roots as an independent artist. Her first memoir, You Ain’t Got No Easter Clothes—a recounting of her traumatic childhood—was published by Hyperion Books in 2004. She lives in Seattle, Washington.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
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Published on
Oct 18, 2016
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Pages
248
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ISBN
9781631581120
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Social Activists
History / United States / 21st Century
Humor / Topic / Politics
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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