Nurturing Child and Adolescent Spirituality: Perspectives from the World's Religious Traditions

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Nurturing Child and Adolescent Spirituality: Perspectives from the World's Religious Traditions provides a forum for prominent religious scholars to examine the state of religious knowledge and theological reflection on spiritual development in childhood and adolescence. Featuring essays from thinkers representing the world's major religious traditions, the book introduces new voices, challenges assumptions, raises new questions, and broadens the base of knowledge and investment in this important domain of life. It specifically and intentionally focuses on theological and philosophical perspectives from within religious traditions, creating space for the religious traditions to find their voices. Nurturing Child and Adolescent Spirituality is firmly grounded in the language and priorities of religious studies, and helps stimulate explorations of whether and how religious communities are tapping their own wisdom and strengths in nurturing today's young people in a complex and changing world. Nurturing Child and Adolescent Spirituality will set the stage for new waves of scholarship and dialogue within and across traditions, disciplines, and cultures that will enrich understanding and strengthen how the world's religious traditions, and others, understand and cultivate the spiritual lives of children and adolescents around the globe.
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About the author

Karen Marie Yust, Th.D., is associate professor of Christian education at Union Theological Seminary and Presbyterian School of Christian Education. Aostre N. Johnson, Ed.D., is associate professor of education at Saint Michael's College, where she teaches curriculum and pedagogy courses and directs the master's program in curriculum. Sandy Eisenberg Sasso, D.D., is the rabbi of Congregation Beth-El Zedeck. Eugene C. Roehlkepartain is senior advisor and director of Family and Congregation Initiatives for Search Institute, Minneapolis. He serves as co-director for the institute's initiative on spiritual development in childhood and adolescence.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
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Published on
Dec 27, 2005
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Pages
496
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ISBN
9781461665908
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Language
English
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Genres
Psychology / Developmental / Adolescent
Psychology / Developmental / Child
Religion / Psychology of Religion
Religion / Sexuality & Gender Studies
Religion / Spirituality
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Lately, I have been re-acquainting myself with the writings of Rich Alapack through his latest books -- Loves Pivotal Relationships, Sorrows Profiles, and White Hot True Blue. These reminded me of the lucid beauty of Alapacks writing style and of the deep and penetrating insights that he shares with his reader. I recognize myself and others in the vignettes these books provide, and have been incorporating his texts into my recent graduate classes.

Alapacks writings mark a return to the original form in which phenomenologists used to communicate with their readers: via straightforward reflection; drawing upon a lifetime of experience; speaking in simple, descriptive language; and capturing the essence of human experience by mastering the art of speaking truthfully and authentically. It takes a certain kind of free-courageousness to engage in such writing today, in an intellectual climate where demands for methodological rigor (in the form of operationalism run amok) have compromised manuscripts submitted for review, in favor of half-hearted statements of methodological orthodoxy followed by statements of findings that amount to little more than summaries of raw data. What Alapack has achieved in his recent writings, and especially in his latest venture, The Splendor of Seeing and the Magic of Touch, is a truth-speaking both from the authors heart and from his lifetime of authentic dialogue with the interlocutors he has found along his own lifes journey. The gift that he gives to his reader is the gift of inviting us to join him on his own path to enlightenment.

Scott D Churchill, PhD
Professor and Graduate Program Director
University of Dallas
Editor-in-Chief, The Humanistic Psychologist

This book is heart-warming, joyful, and insightfully brilliant. This authors newest publication, once again, represents a heart-felt and dedicated effort to researching human phenomena from the laboratory of day-today life. In this lifelong work, the author shares many of his personal experiences, experiences of others, then invites us to share a developmental journey through monumental experiences in our childhood, adolescence and young adulthood. He delves into important developmental topics that are rarely, if ever, discussed in mainstream psychological writing. Dr. Alapack offers reflected insight into these experiences, in a playful yet profound manner, allowing us to gain a deeper understanding of who we are, as perfectly imperfect people. Exploring the dynamics of peekaboo with a young-one, playing tag as a juvenile, sharing the exhilarating and/or bitter-sweet memories of the first kiss, barely coping with or perhaps flaunting a teenage hickey, will have you smiling with fondness, as you are reminded of your own experiences.

These personal stories and parables are timeless and ageless. This text should be mandatory reading for both students and researchers in developmental psychology. Parents and Educators will find this book personally enriching, and will ultimately benefit from a more in- depth understanding of themselves and their children. I have seen Dr. Alapacks work grow and expand over the years, and this book is a shining example of an existential phenomenologist par excellence. His dedicated work has had a major and significant impact on my personal and professional life.

Paul Watters, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed.
M.Ed., Lambton Kent District School Board, Sarnia, Ontario, Canada

James M. Herzog's Father Hunger: Explorations with Adults and Children will quickly take its place both as a landmark contribution to developmental psychology and as an enduring classic in the clinical literature of psychoanalysis. We live in an era when a great many children grow up without a father, or, worse still, with fathers who traumatically abuse them. Yet, society continues to ignore the emotional price that children pay, and often continue to pay throughout their lives, for this tragic state of affairs.

Father Hunger will change this situation. First drawn to his topic by observing the recurring nightmares of clinic-referred children of newly separated parents - nightmares in which the children's fear of their own aggression was coupled with desperate wishes for their fathers' return - Herzog went on to spend more than two decades exploring the role of the father in a variety of naturalistic settings. He discovered that the characteristically intense manner in which fathers engaged their children provided an experience of contained excitement that served as a necessary scaffolding to the children's emerging sense of self and as a potential buffer against future trauma.

A brilliant observer and remarkably gifted, caring clinician, Herzog remains true to the ambiguities and multiple leves of meaning that arise in therapeutic encounters with real people. He consistently locates his therapeutic strategies and clinical discoveries within a sophisticated observational framework, thus making his formulations about father hunger and its remediation of immediate value to scientific researchers. A model of humane psychoanalytic exploration in response to a deepening social problem, Father Hunger is a clinical document destined to raise public consciousness and help shape social policy. And in the extraordinary stories of therapeutic struggle and restoration that emerge from its pages, it is a stunning testament to the resiliency of the human spirit.

A New York Times Bestseller

Renowned neurologist Dr. Frances E. Jensen offers a revolutionary look at the brains of teenagers, dispelling myths and offering practical advice for teens, parents and teachers.

Dr. Frances E. Jensen is chair of the department of neurology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. As a mother, teacher, researcher, clinician, and frequent lecturer to parents and teens, she is in a unique position to explain to readers the workings of the teen brain. In The Teenage Brain, Dr. Jensen brings to readers the astonishing findings that previously remained buried in academic journals.

The root myth scientists believed for years was that the adolescent brain was essentially an adult one, only with fewer miles on it. Over the last decade, however, the scientific community has learned that the teen years encompass vitally important stages of brain development.  Samples of some of the most recent findings include:

Teens are better learners than adults because their brain cells more readily "build" memories. But this heightened adaptability can be hijacked by addiction, and the adolescent brain can become addicted more strongly and for a longer duration than the adult brain.Studies show that girls' brains are a full two years more mature than boys' brains in the mid-teens, possibly explaining differences seen in the classroom and in social behavior.Adolescents may not be as resilient to the effects of drugs as we thought. Recent experimental and human studies show that the occasional use of marijuana, for instance, can cause lingering memory problems even days after smoking, and that long-term use of pot impacts later adulthood IQ.Multi-tasking causes divided attention and has been shown to reduce learning ability in the teenage brain. Multi-tasking also has some addictive qualities, which may result in habitual short attention in teenagers.Emotionally stressful situations may impact the adolescent more than it would affect the adult: stress can have permanent effects on mental health and can to lead to higher risk of developing neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression.

Dr. Jensen gathers what we’ve discovered about adolescent brain function, wiring, and capacity and explains the science in the contexts of everyday learning and multitasking, stress and memory, sleep, addiction, and decision-making.  In this groundbreaking yet accessible book, these findings also yield practical suggestions that will help adults and teenagers negotiate the mysterious world of adolescent development.

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