Political Development in Hong Kong: State, Political Society, and Civil Society

Hong Kong University Press
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This book reviews the political development of Hong Kong before and after 1997, in particular the evolution of state-society relations in the last two decades, to analyze the slow development of democracy and governance in Hong Kong after 1997.

This book is a most comprehensive analysis of the multi-faceted changes in Hong Kong in the last 20 years. The scope of changes analyzed included state functions and institutions, political changes such as party development and development of the Legislative Council, and social changes such as social movements, civil liberties, etc. It helps the reader understand the crisis of governance of Hong Kong after 1997, and the difficulty of democratic development in Hong Kong over the years.

The book covers: changing state institutions in Hong Kong in the last few decades; party development in Hong Kong; the changing role and function of the legislature in Hong Kong; the evolution of social movement and movement organizational forms; media freedom, civil liberties, and the role of civil society; and theoretical discussions concerning governance problems and state-society relations in Hong Kong. Special emphasis is placed on how these changes brought about a new state-society relation, which in turn brought governance difficulties after 1997.


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About the author

Ma Ngok got his Ph.D in Political Science at UCLA. He has previously taught at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and is now Associate Professor in the Department of Government and Administration at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. His research interests include parties and elections in Hong Kong, social movement and state-society relations in Hong Kong, East European transformation, elections, and democratization. His most recent book was Political Consequences of Electoral Laws: The Experience of the Hong Kong Proportional Representation System.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Hong Kong University Press
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Published on
Jan 1, 2007
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Pages
318
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ISBN
9789622098091
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / American Government / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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