CUPS (Common Unix Printing System)

Pearson Education
Free sample

The Common UNIX Printing System is quickly becoming the standard printing solution for Linux. This book provides you with detailed instructions on using, administering, and programming for the Common UNIX Printing System. In addition to the CUPS software, this book includes information and online downloads of many popular add-ons to CUPS that provide enhanced graphical interfaces and printer drivers.
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About the author

Michael Sweet is co-owner of Easy Software Products, a small software firm specializing in Internet and printing technologies. He first started using a computer terminal at the age of 6 and sold his first program at age 12. Michael's obsession with printing and graphics led him to develop image printing software for dot-matrix and later inkjet printers. After graduating with a bachelor's degree in computer science from the SUNY Institute of Technology in Utica/Rome, he moved to Maryland to pursue a career in real-time computer graphics for the Navy. After a few years working for the Navy, he again began writing printer drivers. He released a freeware program called "topcl", and then went on to found Easy Software Products and develop the highly successful ESP Print software. In 1997 he began work on the Common UNIX Printing System, and in 1999, his company released CUPS under the GNU GPL and ESP Print Pro as a commercial product. Aside from writing printer drivers, Michael is also author or co-author of several books, including Serial Programming Guide for POSIX Operating Systems and OpenGL Superbible.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Pearson Education
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Published on
Aug 28, 2001
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Pages
648
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ISBN
9780768686661
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Language
English
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Genres
Computers / Operating Systems / UNIX
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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“As an author, editor, and publisher, I never paid much attention to the competition—except in a few cases. This is one of those cases. The UNIX System Administration Handbook is one of the few books we ever measured ourselves against.”

—Tim O’Reilly, founder of O’Reilly Media

“This edition is for those whose systems live in the cloud or in virtualized data centers; those whose administrative work largely takes the form of automation and configuration source code; those who collaborate closely with developers, network engineers, compliance officers, and all the other worker bees who inhabit the modern hive.”

—Paul Vixie, Internet Hall of Fame-recognized innovator and founder of ISC and Farsight Security

“This book is fun and functional as a desktop reference. If you use UNIX and Linux systems, you need this book in your short-reach library. It covers a bit of the systems’ history but doesn’t bloviate. It’s just straight-forward information delivered in a colorful and memorable fashion.”

—Jason A. Nunnelley

UNIX® and Linux® System Administration Handbook, Fifth Edition, is today’s definitive guide to installing, configuring, and maintaining any UNIX or Linux system, including systems that supply core Internet and cloud infrastructure.

Updated for new distributions and cloud environments, this comprehensive guide covers best practices for every facet of system administration, including storage management, network design and administration, security, web hosting, automation, configuration management, performance analysis, virtualization, DNS, security, and the management of IT service organizations. The authors—world-class, hands-on technologists—offer indispensable new coverage of cloud platforms, the DevOps philosophy, continuous deployment, containerization, monitoring, and many other essential topics.

Whatever your role in running systems and networks built on UNIX or Linux, this conversational, well-written ¿guide will improve your efficiency and help solve your knottiest problems.

Learn to use Unix, OS X, or Linux quickly and easily!


In just 24 lessons of one hour or less, Sams Teach Yourself Unix in 24 Hours helps you get up and running with Unix and Unix-based operating systems such as Mac OS X and Linux.

Designed for beginners with no previous experience using Unix, this book’s straightforward, step-by-step approach makes it easy to learn.

Each lesson clearly explains essential Unix tools and techniques from the ground up, helping you to become productive as quickly and efficiently as possible.

Step-by-step instructions carefully walk you through the most common Unix tasks. Practical, hands-on examples show you how to apply what you learn. Quizzes and exercises help you test your knowledge and stretch your skills. Notes and tips point out shortcuts and solutions

Learn how to…

Pick the command shell that’s best for you Organize the Unix file system (and why) Manage file and directory ownership and permissions Maximize your productivity with power filters and pipes Use the vi and emacs editors Create your own commands and shell scripts Connect to remote systems using SSH and SFTP Troubleshoot common problems List files and manage disk usage Get started with Unix shell programming Set up printing in a Unix environment Archive and back up files Search for information and files Use Perl as an alternative Unix programming language Set up, tweak, and make use of the GNOME graphical environment Contents at a Glance

HOUR 1: What Is This Unix Stuff?

HOUR 2: Getting onto the System and Using the Command Line

HOUR 3: Moving About the File System

HOUR 4: Listing Files and Managing Disk Usage

HOUR 5: Ownership and Permissions

HOUR 6: Creating, Moving, Renaming, and Deleting Files and Directories

HOUR 7: Looking into Files

HOUR 8: Filters, Pipes, and Wildcards!

HOUR 9: Slicing and Dicing Command-Pipe Data

HOUR 10: An Introduction to the vi Editor

HOUR 11: Advanced vi Tricks, Tools, and Techniquess

HOUR 12: An Overview of the emacs Editor

HOUR 13: Introduction to Command Shells

HOUR 14: Advanced Shell Interaction

HOUR 15: Job Control

HOUR 16: Shell Programming Overview

HOUR 17: Advanced Shell Programming

HOUR 18: Printing in the Unix Environment

HOUR 19: Archives and Backups

HOUR 20: Using Email to Communicate

HOUR 21: Connecting to Remote Systems Using SSH and SFTP

HOUR 22: Searching for Information and Files

HOUR 23: Perl Programming in Unix

HOUR 24: GNOME and the GUI Environment

Appendix A: Common Unix Questions and Answers


The Complete Guide to Optimizing Systems Performance

Written by the winner of the 2013 LISA Award for Outstanding Achievement in System Administration


Large-scale enterprise, cloud, and virtualized computing systems have introduced serious performance challenges. Now, internationally renowned performance expert Brendan Gregg has brought together proven methodologies, tools, and metrics for analyzing and tuning even the most complex environments. Systems Performance: Enterprise and the Cloud focuses on Linux® and Unix® performance, while illuminating performance issues that are relevant to all operating systems. You’ll gain deep insight into how systems work and perform, and learn methodologies for analyzing and improving system and application performance. Gregg presents examples from bare-metal systems and virtualized cloud tenants running Linux-based Ubuntu®, Fedora®, CentOS, and the illumos-based Joyent® SmartOS™ and OmniTI OmniOS®. He systematically covers modern systems performance, including the “traditional” analysis of CPUs, memory, disks, and networks, and new areas including cloud computing and dynamic tracing. This book also helps you identify and fix the “unknown unknowns” of complex performance: bottlenecks that emerge from elements and interactions you were not aware of. The text concludes with a detailed case study, showing how a real cloud customer issue was analyzed from start to finish.

Coverage includes

• Modern performance analysis and tuning: terminology, concepts, models, methods, and techniques

• Dynamic tracing techniques and tools, including examples of DTrace, SystemTap, and perf

• Kernel internals: uncovering what the OS is doing

• Using system observability tools, interfaces, and frameworks

• Understanding and monitoring application performance

• Optimizing CPUs: processors, cores, hardware threads, caches, interconnects, and kernel scheduling

• Memory optimization: virtual memory, paging, swapping, memory architectures, busses, address spaces, and allocators

• File system I/O, including caching

• Storage devices/controllers, disk I/O workloads, RAID, and kernel I/O

• Network-related performance issues: protocols, sockets, interfaces, and physical connections

• Performance implications of OS and hardware-based virtualization, and new issues encountered with cloud computing

• Benchmarking: getting accurate results and avoiding common mistakes

This guide is indispensable for anyone who operates enterprise or cloud environments: system, network, database, and web admins; developers; and other professionals. For students and others new to optimization, it also provides exercises reflecting Gregg’s extensive instructional experience.

O'Reilly's bestselling book on Linux's bash shell is at it again. Now that Linux is an established player both as a server and on the desktop Learning the bash Shell has been updated and refreshed to account for all the latest changes. Indeed, this third edition serves as the most valuable guide yet to the bash shell.As any good programmer knows, the first thing users of the Linux operating system come face to face with is the shell the UNIX term for a user interface to the system. In other words, it's what lets you communicate with the computer via the keyboard and display. Mastering the bash shell might sound fairly simple but it isn't. In truth, there are many complexities that need careful explanation, which is just what Learning the bash Shell provides.If you are new to shell programming, the book provides an excellent introduction, covering everything from the most basic to the most advanced features. And if you've been writing shell scripts for years, it offers a great way to find out what the new shell offers. Learning the bash Shell is also full of practical examples of shell commands and programs that will make everyday use of Linux that much easier. With this book, programmers will learn:How to install bash as your login shellThe basics of interactive shell use, including UNIX file and directory structures, standard I/O, and background jobsCommand line editing, history substitution, and key bindingsHow to customize your shell environment without programmingThe nuts and bolts of basic shell programming, flow control structures, command-line options and typed variablesProcess handling, from job control to processes, coroutines and subshellsDebugging techniques, such as trace and verbose modesTechniques for implementing system-wide shell customization and features related to system security
For more than twenty years, serious C programmers have relied on one book for practical, in-depth knowledge of the programming interfaces that drive the UNIX and Linux kernels: W. Richard Stevens’ Advanced Programming in the UNIX® Environment . Now, once again, Rich’s colleague Steve Rago has thoroughly updated this classic work. The new third edition supports today’s leading platforms, reflects new technical advances and best practices, and aligns with Version 4 of the Single UNIX Specification.

Steve carefully retains the spirit and approach that have made this book so valuable. Building on Rich’s pioneering work, he begins with files, directories, and processes, carefully laying the groundwork for more advanced techniques, such as signal handling and terminal I/O. He also thoroughly covers threads and multithreaded programming, and socket-based IPC.

This edition covers more than seventy new interfaces, including POSIX asynchronous I/O, spin locks, barriers, and POSIX semaphores. Most obsolete interfaces have been removed, except for a few that are ubiquitous. Nearly all examples have been tested on four modern platforms: Solaris 10, Mac OS X version 10.6.8 (Darwin 10.8.0), FreeBSD 8.0, and Ubuntu version 12.04 (based on Linux 3.2).

As in previous editions, you’ll learn through examples, including more than ten thousand lines of downloadable, ISO C source code. More than four hundred system calls and functions are demonstrated with concise, complete programs that clearly illustrate their usage, arguments, and return values. To tie together what you’ve learned, the book presents several chapter-length case studies, each reflecting contemporary environments.

Advanced Programming in the UNIX® Environment has helped generations of programmers write code with exceptional power, performance, and reliability. Now updated for today’s systems, this third edition will be even more valuable.

There's nothing that hard-core Unix and Linux users are more fanatical about than their text editor. Editors are the subject of adoration and worship, or of scorn and ridicule, depending upon whether the topic of discussion is your editor or someone else's.

vi has been the standard editor for close to 30 years. Popular on Unix and Linux, it has a growing following on Windows systems, too. Most experienced system administrators cite vi as their tool of choice. And since 1986, this book has been the guide for vi.

However, Unix systems are not what they were 30 years ago, and neither is this book. While retaining all the valuable features of previous editions, the 7th edition of Learning the vi and vim Editors has been expanded to include detailed information on vim, the leading vi clone. vim is the default version of vi on most Linux systems and on Mac OS X, and is available for many other operating systems too.

With this guide, you learn text editing basics and advanced tools for both editors, such as multi-window editing, how to write both interactive macros and scripts to extend the editor, and power tools for programmers -- all in the easy-to-follow style that has made this book a classic.

Learning the vi and vim Editors includes:

A complete introduction to text editing with vi:How to move around vi in a hurryBeyond the basics, such as using buffersvi's global search and replacementAdvanced editing, including customizing vi and executing Unix commands

How to make full use of vim:Extended text objects and more powerful regular expressionsMulti-window editing and powerful vim scriptsHow to make full use of the GUI version of vim, called gvimvim's enhancements for programmers, such as syntax highlighting, folding and extended tags

Coverage of three other popular vi clones -- nvi, elvis, and vile -- is also included. You'll find several valuable appendixes, including an alphabetical quick reference to both vi and ex mode commands for regular vi and for vim, plus an updated appendix on vi and the Internet.

Learning either vi or vim is required knowledge if you use Linux or Unix, and in either case, reading this book is essential. After reading this book, the choice of editor will be obvious for you too.
sed & awk describes two text processing programs that are mainstays of the UNIX programmer's toolbox.sed is a "stream editor" for editing streams of text that might be too large to edit as a single file, or that might be generated on the fly as part of a larger data processing step. The most common operation done with sed is substitution, replacing one block of text with another.awk is a complete programming language. Unlike many conventional languages, awk is "data driven" -- you specify what kind of data you are interested in and the operations to be performed when that data is found. awk does many things for you, including automatically opening and closing data files, reading records, breaking the records up into fields, and counting the records. While awk provides the features of most conventional programming languages, it also includes some unconventional features, such as extended regular expression matching and associative arrays. sed & awk describes both programs in detail and includes a chapter of example sed and awk scripts.This edition covers features of sed and awk that are mandated by the POSIX standard. This most notably affects awk, where POSIX standardized a new variable, CONVFMT, and new functions, toupper() and tolower(). The CONVFMT variable specifies the conversion format to use when converting numbers to strings (awk used to use OFMT for this purpose). The toupper() and tolower() functions each take a (presumably mixed case) string argument and return a new version of the string with all letters translated to the corresponding case.In addition, this edition covers GNU sed, newly available since the first edition. It also updates the first edition coverage of Bell Labs nawk and GNU awk (gawk), covers mawk, an additional freely available implementation of awk, and briefly discusses three commercial versions of awk, MKS awk, Thompson Automation awk (tawk), and Videosoft (VSAwk).
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