South China Sea Event Timeline: 1900–1969

South China Sea Think Tank
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 The South China Sea Event Timeline aims to become the world’s most accurate and comprehensive chronological reference about the history of the South China Sea maritime territorial disputes. From major incidents at sea to meetings and statements of world leaders, events of all types are included in the event timeline, the complete volumes of which span over a century of history in the region. Today, the event timeline is one of the few indispensable sources of information to date for policymakers, researchers, students, the media, and others interested in the disputes.
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About the author

The South China Sea Think Tank (SCSTT) is an affiliated program of the Asia-Pacific Policy Research Association (APPRA), an independent, non-profit organization promoting dialogue, research, and education about policies in the Asia-Pacific region.

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Additional Information

Publisher
South China Sea Think Tank
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Published on
Aug 31, 2018
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Pages
202
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ISBN
9789869282840
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Maritime History & Piracy
Political Science / Geopolitics
Political Science / International Relations / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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