Ecospirit: Religions and Philosophies for the Earth

Fordham Univ Press
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We hope-- even as we often doubt-- that the environmental crisis can be controlled. Public awareness of our species' self-destructive relation to its own materiality is growing. But so is the destruction. The needed practical interventions seem to require a collective shift of such magnitude as to take on spiritual or religious intensity. Traditions of ecological theology and eco-religious praxis have been preparing the way for several decades, yet they have remained marginal to society, academy, and church. With a fresh, transdisciplinary approach, Ecospirit probes the possibility of a green shift radical enough to permeate the ancient roots of our sensibility and the social sources of our practice. Its authors undertake an elemental deconstruction of our theological habits of supernaturalism, our under-thought praxis, as well as our philosophical models of nature. But in this study deconstruction begins to turn upon itself, perplexed by its own earth-blind anthropocentrisms. The possibility of "econstruction" arises.The essays of Ecospirit transmute a paralyzing sense of emergency into the emergence of a moving language of the earth. Grounded in the complex ecosocial contexts in which all creatures become, a discourse for a genesis collective begins to take form. The essays pursue a thought-experiment in multi-leveled, multi-religious, multi-contextual ecospirituality. They embrace introductory exercises in ecotheology, conceptually rigorous engagements with the theological tradition and its philosophical underpinnings, and explorations of the ways that religious praxis can both harm and heal. The book ranges across theology, religious studies, philosophy, literary criticism, ethics, sociology, and cultural studies--all serving to explore
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About the author


LAUREL KEARNS is Associate Professor of Sociology of Religion and Environmental Studies in the Theological School and Graduate Division of Religion of Drew University.

CATHERINE KELLER is Professor of Constructive Theology in the Theological School and Graduate Division of Religion at Drew University. She co-edited with Virginia Burrus the first volume of the Transdisciplinary Theological Colloquia, Toward a Theology of Eros: Transfiguring Passion at the Limits of Discipline (Fordham), and co-edited with Laurel Kearns its second volume, Ecospirit: Philosophies and Religions for the Earth (Fordham). Previous books include Face of the Deep: A Theology of Becoming and On the Mystery: Discerning Divinity in Process.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Fordham Univ Press
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Published on
Dec 31, 2007
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Pages
644
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ISBN
9780823227464
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Earth Sciences / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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In Making the Most of the Anthropocene, scientist Mark Denny tackles this hard truth head-on and considers burning questions: How did we reach our present technological and ecological state? How are we going to cope with our uncertain future? Will we come out of this, or are we doomed as a species? Is there anything we can do about what happens next? This book

• explains what the Anthropocene is and why it is important• offers suggestions for minimizing harm instead of fretting about an impending environmental apocalypse • combines easy-to-grasp scientific, technological, economic, and anthropological analyses

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Until recently, redwoods were thought to be virtually impossible to ascend, and the canopy at the tops of these majestic trees was undiscovered. In The Wild Trees, Richard Preston unfolds the spellbinding story of Steve Sillett, Marie Antoine, and the tiny group of daring botanists and amateur naturalists that found a lost world above California, a world that is dangerous, hauntingly beautiful, and unexplored.

The canopy voyagers are young—just college students when they start their quest—and they share a passion for these trees, persevering in spite of sometimes crushing personal obstacles and failings. They take big risks, they ignore common wisdom (such as the notion that there’s nothing left to discover in North America), and they even make love in hammocks stretched between branches three hundred feet in the air.

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Preston’s account of this amazing world, by turns terrifying, moving, and fascinating, is an adventure story told in novelistic detail by a master of nonfiction narrative. The author shares his protagonists’ passion for tall trees, and he mastered the techniques of tall-tree climbing to tell the story in The Wild Trees—the story of the fate of the world’s most splendid forests and of the imperiled biosphere itself.
In a time of darkening environmental prospects, frightening religious fundamentalism, and moribund liberalism, the remarkable and historically unprecedented rise of religious environmentalism is a profound source of hope. In A Greener Faith , Roger S. Gottlieb chronicles the promises of this critically important movement, illuminating its principal ideas, leading personalities, and ways of connecting care for the earth with justice for human beings. He also shows how religious environmentalism breaks the customary boundaries of "religious issues" in political life. Asserting that environmental degradation is sacrilegious, sinful, and an offense against God catapults religions directly into questions of social policy, economic and moral priorities, and the overall direction of secular society. Gottlieb contends that a spiritual perspective applied to the Earth provides the environmental movement with a uniquely appropriate way to voice its dream of a sustainable and just world. Equally important, it helps develop a world-making political agenda that far exceeds interest group politics applied to forests and toxic incinerators. Rather, religious environmentalism offers an all-inclusive vision of what human beings are and how we should treat each other and the rest of life. Gottlieb deftly analyzes the growing synthesis of the movement's religious, social, and political aspects, as well as the challenges it faces in consumerism, fundamentalism, and globalization. Highly engaging and passionately argued, this book is an indispensable resource for people of faith, environmentalists, scholars, and anyone who is concerned about our planet's future.
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