What Makes the Nobility Noble?

Schriftenreihe der FRIAS School of History

Book 2
Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht
Free sample

In this volume on the history of the European nobility in the modern era, the boundary between the early modern and modern periods after 1800 is deliberately crossed. By focusing on the nobility, the authors explore the continuities and ruptures in European history. In the three thematic areas of law, politics, and aesthetics, different examples are covered, from the noble knights' use of the early modern courts in the Holy Roman Empire to the social and political identity of the English nobility in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The contributions underline the virtuosity with which the nobility met the challenges of their time, and how they managed to be simultaneously 'contemporary' and still retain a specific aristocratic character.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht
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Published on
Dec 31, 2011
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Pages
396
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ISBN
9783525310410
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Europe / General
History / Modern / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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