Controlled Pulmonary Drug Delivery

Springer Science & Business Media
Free sample

The pace of new research and level of innovation repeatedly introduced into the field of drug delivery to the lung is surprising given its state of maturity since the introduction of the pressurized metered dose inhaler over a half a century ago. It is clear that our understanding of pulmonary drug delivery has now evolved to the point that inhalation aerosols can be controlled both spatially and temporally to optimize their biological effects. These abilities include controlling lung deposition, by adopting formulation strategies or device technologies, and controlling drug uptake and release through sophisticated particle technologies. The large number of contributions to the scientific literature and variety of excellent texts published in recent years is evidence for the continued interest in pulmonary drug delivery research. This reference text endeavors to bring together the fundamental theory and practice of controlled drug delivery to the airways that is unavailable elsewhere. Collating and synthesizing the material in this rapidly evolving field presented a challenge and ultimately a sense of achievement that is hopefully reflected in the content of the volume.
Read more
Collapse

About the author

Dr. Hugh Smyth is Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutics at the University of Texas, Austin. He is a recipient of the Young Investigator in Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology Award of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists and has edited a volume on pulmonary drug delivery. Drs. Hickey and Smyth share a research interest in the delivery of drugs to the lungs for the treatment and prevention of a number of diseases.

Dr. Anthony Hickey is Professor of Molecular Pharmaceutics and Biomedical Engineering at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is a fellow of the Institute of Biology, American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He has published several edited and authored volumes in the fields of pharmaceutical aerosols, process engineering and particulate science.

Read more
Collapse
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Jun 24, 2011
Read more
Collapse
Pages
558
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9781441997456
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
Medical / General
Medical / Pharmacy
Medical / Research
Technology & Engineering / Chemical & Biochemical
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Long acting injections and implants improve therapy, enhance patient compliance, improve dosing convenience, and are the most appropriate formulation choice for drugs that undergo extensive first pass metabolism or that exhibit poor oral bioavailability. An intriguing variety of technologies have been developed to provide long acting injections and implants. Many considerations need to go into the design of these systems in order to translate a concept from the lab bench to actual therapy for a patient. This book surveys and summarizes the field.

Topics covered in Long Acting Injections and Implants include the historical development of the field, drugs, diseases and clinical applications for long acting injections and implants, anatomy and physiology for these systems, specific injectable technologies (including lipophilic solutions, aqueous suspensions, microspheres, liposomes, in situ forming depots and self-assembling lipid formulations), specific implantable technologies (including osmotic implants, drug eluting stents and microfabricated systems), peptide, protein and vaccine delivery, sterilization, drug release testing and regulatory aspects of long acting injections and implants.

This volume provides essential information for experienced development professionals but was also written to be useful for scientists just beginning work in the field and for others who need an understanding of long acting injections and implants. This book will also be ideal as a graduate textbook.

The development of new CNS drugs is notoriously difficult. Drugs must reach CNS target sites for action and these sites are protected by a number of barriers, the most important being the blood –brain barrier (BBB). Many factors are therefore critical to consider for CNS drug delivery, e.g. active/passive transport across the BBB, intra-brain distribution, and central/systemic pharmacokinetics, to name a few. Neurological disease and trauma conditions add further complexity because CNS barriers, drug distribution and pharmacokinetics are dynamic and often changed by disease/trauma. Knowledge of all these factors and their interplay in different conditions is of utmost importance for proper CNS drug development and disease treatment. In recent years much information has become available for a better understanding of the many factors important for CNS drug delivery and how they interact to affect drug action. This book describes small and large drug delivery to the brain with an emphasis on the physiology of the BBB and the principles and concepts for drug delivery across the BBB and distribution within the brain. It contains methods descriptions for studying drug delivery, routes and approaches of administering drugs into the brain, the influence of disease, and drug industry perspectives. Therewith, it contributes to an in-depth understanding of the interplay between brain (patho)-physiology and drug characteristics. Furthermore, the content is designed to be both cutting-edge and educational, so that the book can be used in high-level training of academic and industry scientists with full references to original publications. ​
The interpretation of physical, chemical and biological phenomena as linear relationships between variables, or as simple functions of the variables, has been a significant scientific and mathematical strategy to their elucidation for centuries. It is often the case that the nature of linearity is to follow mathematical functions, e.g. power, exponential or logarithmic functions, nevertheless the desire to fit data to simple predictable expressions is imbued in every scientist and engineer. From a philosophical standpoint there is no reason to criticize this approach as it allows us to interpret the natural world and has a lofty heritage going back to the classical world.

However, non-linear phenomena have been identified in many fields and interpreted as periodic, catastrophic, chaotic or complex involving a variety of mathematical tools for analysis. Benoit Mandelbrot’s now classic book on the fractal geometry of nature and the many subsequent texts, most recently Wolfram’s magnum opus "A New Kind of Science" have raised questions about the nature of reality and the interpretation of observed phenomena. It seems clear that the complexity of dynamic events (on any scale) can rarely be explained by linear interpretations. The rare exceptions are likely to represent a convergence of multiple phenomena giving the appearance of a linear relationship between variables.

In fields related to pharmaceutical sciences some texts have been written by pioneers such as Brian Kaye. His eminently readable "A random walk through fractal dimensions" and "Chaos and complexity" were seminal volumes for the editors. Tracing the mathematics of complexity back to the nineteenth century and beyond gives a validity to the search for more accurate interpretations of experimental observations that should impact on the pharmaceutical sciences as significantly as other fields of endeavor.

The chemistry and physics literature is replete with papers on complexity from such notables as Ilya Prigogine and Murray Gell-Mann. A broad range of biological phenomena, the most complex imaginable from molecular biology to ecology, are now the subject of complexity analysis. Pharmaceutical sciences encompass the biology, chemistry, physics and mathematics associated with drug discovery, delivery, disposition and action. This text describes a range of topics of importance in the pharmaceutical sciences that indicate a need for a non-linear interpretation if they are to be characterized accurately, understood fully and potentially controlled or modulated in the service of improved therapeutic strategies.

It is likely that the future will involve increasingly complex interpretations of data related to drug design and delivery, particularly as our knowledge of the human genome leads inexorably to the potential for individualized therapy. We hope that this text will promote discussion of the varied phenomena leading to pharmacological effect and the complex interactions ultimately resulting in improved disease control and health maintenance.

Mass immunization is the blitzkrieg of vaccination practice. It serves to rapidly protect populations, both because of the high coverage achieved and because of the herd immunity thereby induced. However, as in war, mass immunization campaigns must be conducted intelligently, with careful strategy and strong attention to logistics of supply and deployment. If conducted badly, mass immunization may fail or even be counter-productive. In this volume, some of the most successful practitioners of mass im- nization tell us about its art and science. David Heymann and Bruce Aylward of WHO begin the book with a theoretical and practical overview of mass immunization. Michael Lane, who participated in the successful effort to eradicate smallpox relates how this was done using mass vaccination and other strategies. Application of mass immunization by the US military is c- ered by John Grabenstein and Remington Nevin, who have a large experience in these matters. Karen Noakes and David Salisbury recount the striking s- cesses of mass immunization in the United Kingdom. The global control of the clostridia that produce diphtheria toxin is described by Charles Vitek. Hepa- tis A is decreasing dramatically under the impact of large-scale vaccination, as Francis André illustrates. The French experience with Hepatitis B vac- nation has been mixed, and François Denis and Daniel Levy-Bruhl explain the circumstances. In?uenza vaccination is an annual example of large-scale campaigns, the complexity of which is recounted by Benjamin Schwartz and Pascale Wortley.
Covering everything you need to study for and pass the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board (PTCB) and ExCPT exams, Mosby's Review for the Pharmacy Technician Certification Examination, 3rd Edition makes exam preparation easy. Review the content you'll see on the exam with handy outlines, test-taking tips and strategies, and electronic flash cards. Written by noted pharmacy technician educator James J. Mizner, this complete review tests your knowledge and simulates the actual PTCB exam with 17 different, 100-question practice exams in the book and online. This edition is modeled after the updated Pharmacy Technician Certification Exam Blueprint.A total of 1,700 review questions are included in 17 practice exams in the book and online.100-question format of each practice exam simulates the PTCB and ExCPT exams, with multiple-choice questions and the same balance of content, for a realistic test taking experience.700 electronic flash cards help you learn and remember facts by covering the top 200 most prescribed pharmaceuticals, top 50 herbals, abbreviations, and sound-alike drugs.Review content reflects the new percentages covered on the PTCB exam.A convenient outline format helps you to quickly review important information you'll see on the exam.Tips and suggestions prepare you for test-taking success by providing an insider’s perspective on what to expect and how to prepare for your exam when you have limited time. Seven practice exams in the book feature the same format and content emphasis as the national exam. Ten practice exams on the Evolve companion website in both timed and untimed modes help you identify any areas of weakness, and include instant feedback and remediation. UPDATED content includes current drug information and pharmacy practice procedures based on the new Pharmacy Technician Certification Exam Blueprint.NEW! Chapter objectives provide a clear breakdown of content and goals for review.
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.