Assassination on Embassy Row

Forbidden Bookshelf

Book 7
Open Road Media
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Edgar Award Finalist: The gripping account of an assassination on US soil and the violent foreign conspiracy that stretched from Pinochet’s Chile to the streets of Washington, DC, with a new introduction by Ariel Dorfman.

On September 10, 1976, exiled Chilean leader Orlando Letelier delivered a blistering rebuke of Augusto Pinochet’s brutal right-wing regime in a speech at Madison Square Garden. Eleven days later, while Letelier was on Embassy Row in Washington, DC, a bomb affixed to the bottom of his car exploded, killing him and his coworker Ronni Moffitt. The slaying, staggering in its own right, exposed an international conspiracy that reached well into US territory. Pinochet had targeted Letelier, a former Chilean foreign minister and ambassador to the United States, and carried out the attack with the help of Operation Condor, the secret alliance of South America’s military dictatorships dedicated to wiping out their most influential opponents.

This gripping account tells the story not only of a political plot that ended in murder, but also of the FBI’s inquiry into the affair. Definitive in its examination both of Letelier’s murder and of the subsequent investigations carried out by American intelligence, Assassination on Embassy Row is equal parts keen analysis and true-life spy thriller.
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About the author

John Dinges is the Godfrey Lowell Cabot Professor of Journalism at Columbia University. After a long career in newspapers and radio, and authorship of three books on Latin America, Dinges is currently dedicated to supporting high-quality journalism in Latin America. He lectures frequently in both Spanish and English, concentrating especially on dictatorships and human rights, journalism quality and investigative reporting, and media and democracy. He created the nonprofit Center for Investigation and Information (CIINFO) to organize and finance reporting projects in Latin America. Dinges lives in Washington, DC.

Saul Landau (1936–2013) was an internationally known scholar, author, commentator, and filmmaker who worked for forty years on social, political, and human rights issues. Landau authored fourteen books and produced more than forty films. He received several honors, including an Emmy Award for Paul Jacobs and the Nuclear Gang, an Edgar Award for Assassination on Embassy Row, a George Polk Award for his investigative reporting, a Hugh M. Hefner First Amendment Award, and a Letelier-Moffitt Human Rights Award. In 2008 the Chilean government presented Landau with the Order of Bernardo O’Higgins for his human rights work, and in 2013 the Cuban government gave him the Medal of Friendship.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Open Road Media
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Published on
Sep 16, 2014
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Pages
420
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ISBN
9781497672734
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Intelligence & Espionage
Political Science / Political Ideologies / Fascism & Totalitarianism
Social Science / Conspiracy Theories
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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