Studies in the Contract Laws of Asia: Remedies for Breach of Contract

Oxford University Press
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Studies in the Contract Laws of Asia provides an authoritative account of the contract law regimes of selected Asian jurisdictions, including the major centres of commerce where until now, limited critical commentaries have been available in the English language. In this new six part series of scholarly essays from leading scholars and commentators, each volume will offer an insider's perspective into specific areas of contract law, including: remedies, formation, parties, contents, vitiating factors, change of circumstances, illegality, and public policy, and will explore how these diverse jurisdictions address common problems encountered in contractual disputes. Concluding each volume will be a closing discussion of the convergences and divergences throughout eachacross the jurisdictions, and comparisons with European jurisdictions from which Asians well as an overview of the common themes found throughout each jurisdiction .contract law derive. Volume I of this series examines the remedies for breach of contract in the laws of China, India, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Korea, and Thailand. Specifically, it addresses the readiness of each legal system in their action to insist that parties perform their obligations; the methods of enforcing the parties' agreed remedies for breach; and the ways in which monetary compensation are awarded. Each jurisdiction is discussed over two chapters; the first chapter will examine the performance remedies and agreed remedies, while the second explores the monetary remedies. A concluding chapter offers a comparative overview.
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About the author

Mindy Chen-Wishart is a Reader in Contract Law and Associate Dean of Graduates at Oxford University. She also holds a fractional professorship at the National University of Singapore. She specialises in contract, restitution, philosophical foundations of the common law, and contract law and fundamental rights. She is author of Contract Law (5th ed, OUP, 2015), an editor of Chitty on Contract, and a member of the Advisory Group on A Restatement of the English Law of Contract. Mindy lectures to the Judicial College and was named author of the best paper of 2013 in the International and Comparative Law Quarterly. She holds or has held visiting professorships at Hong Kong University, the National University of Taiwan, Otago University, Auckland University, Canterbury University and Gottingen University. Alexander Loke JSD, LLM (Columbia), LLB (Hons)(NUS) is Professor at City University of Hong Kong. Loke researches and publishes on contract law, corporate and securities law, and international finance. Loke was one of the founders of the Centre for Banking & Finance Law at NUS Law, and was responsible for creating its researcher program. He was also the founding editor of the Asian Journal of Comparative Law, which was accorded "A" in Australian Research Council ranking of world journals. Burton Ong is an Associate Professor at the Faculty of Law of the National University of Singapore (NUS), where he teaches and researches in the areas of Contract Law, Competition Law, and Intellectual Property Law. He graduated from NUS (LLB, 1st Class Hons; Lee Kuan Yew Gold Medal), Oxford University (Vinerian Scholarship) and Harvard Law School. He is a Director (Competition Law) at the NUS Centre for Law and Business, Deputy Director at the Asia-Pacific Centre for Environmental Law and Fellow at the IP Academy.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Oxford University Press
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Published on
Feb 11, 2016
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Pages
450
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ISBN
9780191074424
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Language
English
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Genres
Law / Comparative
Law / Constitutional
Law / Contracts
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Studies in the Contract Laws of Asia provides an authoritative account of the contract law regimes of selected Asian jurisdictions, including the major centres of commerce where limited critical commentaries have been published in the English language. Each volume in the series aims to offer an insider's perspective into specific areas of contract law - remedies, formation, parties, contents, vitiating factors, change of circumstances, illegality, and public policy - and explores how these diverse jurisdictions address common problems encountered in contractual disputes. A concluding chapter draws out the convergences and divergences, and other themes. All the Asian jurisdictions examined have inherited or adopted the common law or civil law models of European legal systems. Scholars of legal transplant will find a mine of information on how received law has developed after the initial adaptation and transplant process, including the mechanisms of and influences affecting these developments. At the same time, many points of convergence emerge. These provide good starting points for regional harmonization projects. Volume II of this series deals with contract formation and contracts for the benefit of third parties in the laws of China, India, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Korea, Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand, Indonesia, and Myanmar. Typically, each jurisdiction is covered in two chapters; the first deals with contract formation, while the second deals with contracts for the benefit of third parties.
In this original, far-reaching, and timely book, Justice Stephen Breyer examines the work of the Supreme Court of the United States in an increasingly interconnected world, a world in which all sorts of activity, both public and private—from the conduct of national security policy to the conduct of international trade—obliges the Court to understand and consider circumstances beyond America’s borders.

It is a world of instant communications, lightning-fast commerce, and shared problems (like public health threats and environmental degradation), and it is one in which the lives of Americans are routinely linked ever more pervasively to those of people in foreign lands. Indeed, at a moment when anyone may engage in direct transactions internationally for services previously bought and sold only locally (lodging, for instance, through online sites), it has become clear that, even in ordinary matters, judicial awareness can no longer stop at the water’s edge.   
To trace how foreign considerations have come to inform the thinking of the Court, Justice Breyer begins with that area of the law in which they have always figured prominently: national security in its constitutional dimension—how should the Court balance this imperative with others, chiefly the protection of basic liberties, in its review of presidential and congressional actions? He goes on to show that as the world has grown steadily “smaller,” the Court’s horizons have inevitably expanded: it has been obliged to consider a great many more matters that now cross borders. What is the geographical reach of an American statute concerning, say, securities fraud, antitrust violations, or copyright protections? And in deciding such matters, can the Court interpret American laws so that they might work more efficiently with similar laws in other nations?

While Americans must necessarily determine their own laws through democratic process, increasingly, the smooth operation of American law—and, by extension, the advancement of American interests and values—depends on its working in harmony with that of other jurisdictions. Justice Breyer describes how the aim of cultivating such harmony, as well as the expansion of the rule of law overall, with its attendant benefits, has drawn American jurists into the relatively new role of “constitutional diplomats,” a little remarked but increasingly important job for them in this fast-changing world.

Written with unique authority and perspective, The Court and the World reveals an emergent reality few Americans observe directly but one that affects the life of every one of us. Here is an invaluable understanding for lawyers and non-lawyers alike.


From the Hardcover edition.
Studies in the Contract Laws of Asia provides an authoritative account of the contract law regimes of selected Asian jurisdictions, including the major centres of commerce where limited critical commentaries have been published in the English language. Each volume in the series aims to offer an insider's perspective into specific areas of contract law - remedies, formation, parties, contents, vitiating factors, change of circumstances, illegality, and public policy - and explores how these diverse jurisdictions address common problems encountered in contractual disputes. A concluding chapter draws out the convergences and divergences, and other themes. All the Asian jurisdictions examined have inherited or adopted the common law or civil law models of European legal systems. Scholars of legal transplant will find a mine of information on how received law has developed after the initial adaptation and transplant process, including the mechanisms of and influences affecting these developments. At the same time, many points of convergence emerge. These provide good starting points for regional harmonization projects. Volume II of this series deals with contract formation and contracts for the benefit of third parties in the laws of China, India, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Korea, Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand, Indonesia, and Myanmar. Typically, each jurisdiction is covered in two chapters; the first deals with contract formation, while the second deals with contracts for the benefit of third parties.
Studies in the Contract Laws of Asia provides an authoritative account of the contract law regimes of selected Asian jurisdictions, including the major centres of commerce where until now, limited critical commentaries have been available in the English language. In this new six part series of scholarly essays from leading scholars and commentators, each volume will offer an insider's perspective into specific areas of contract law, including: remedies, formation, parties, contents, vitiating factors, change of circumstances, illegality, and public policy, and will explore how these diverse jurisdictions address common problems encountered in contractual disputes. Concluding each volume will be a closing discussion of the convergences and divergences throughout eachacross the jurisdictions, and comparisons with European jurisdictions from which Asians well as an overview of the common themes found throughout each jurisdiction .contract law derive. Volume I of this series examines the remedies for breach of contract in the laws of China, India, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Korea, and Thailand. Specifically, it addresses the readiness of each legal system in their action to insist that parties perform their obligations; the methods of enforcing the parties' agreed remedies for breach; and the ways in which monetary compensation are awarded. Each jurisdiction is discussed over two chapters; the first chapter will examine the performance remedies and agreed remedies, while the second explores the monetary remedies. A concluding chapter offers a comparative overview.
Studies in the Contract Laws of Asia provides an authoritative account of the contract law regimes of selected Asian jurisdictions, including the major centres of commerce where limited critical commentaries have been published in the English language. Each volume in the series aims to offer an insider's perspective into specific areas of contract law - remedies, formation, parties, contents, vitiating factors, change of circumstances, illegality, and public policy - and explores how these diverse jurisdictions address common problems encountered in contractual disputes. A concluding chapter draws out the convergences and divergences, and other themes. All the Asian jurisdictions examined have inherited or adopted the common law or civil law models of European legal systems. Scholars of legal transplant will find a mine of information on how received law has developed after the initial adaptation and transplant process, including the mechanisms of and influences affecting these developments. At the same time, many points of convergence emerge. These provide good starting points for regional harmonization projects. Volume II of this series deals with contract formation and contracts for the benefit of third parties in the laws of China, India, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Korea, Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand, Indonesia, and Myanmar. Typically, each jurisdiction is covered in two chapters; the first deals with contract formation, while the second deals with contracts for the benefit of third parties.
Studies in the Contract Laws of Asia provides an authoritative account of the contract law regimes of selected Asian jurisdictions, including the major centres of commerce where limited critical commentaries have been published in the English language. Each volume in the series aims to offer an insider's perspective into specific areas of contract law - remedies, formation, parties, contents, vitiating factors, change of circumstances, illegality, and public policy - and explores how these diverse jurisdictions address common problems encountered in contractual disputes. A concluding chapter draws out the convergences and divergences, and other themes. All the Asian jurisdictions examined have inherited or adopted the common law or civil law models of European legal systems. Scholars of legal transplant will find a mine of information on how received law has developed after the initial adaptation and transplant process, including the mechanisms of and influences affecting these developments. At the same time, many points of convergence emerge. These provide good starting points for regional harmonization projects. Volume II of this series deals with contract formation and contracts for the benefit of third parties in the laws of China, India, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Korea, Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand, Indonesia, and Myanmar. Typically, each jurisdiction is covered in two chapters; the first deals with contract formation, while the second deals with contracts for the benefit of third parties.
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