Crossing Empires: Taking U.S. History into Transimperial Terrain

Duke University Press
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Weaving U.S. history into the larger fabric of world history, the contributors to Crossing Empires de-exceptionalize the American empire, placing it in a global transimperial context. They draw attention to the breadth of U.S. entanglements with other empires to illuminate the scope and nature of American global power as it reached from the Bering Sea to Australia and East Africa to the Caribbean. With case studies ranging from the 1830s to the late twentieth century, the contributors address topics including diplomacy, governance, anticolonialism, labor, immigration, medicine, religion, and race. Their transimperial approach—whether exemplified in examinations of U.S. steel corporations partnering with British imperialists to build the Ugandan railway or the U.S. reliance on other empires in its governance of the Philippines—transcends histories of interimperial rivalries and conflicts. In so doing, the contributors illuminate the power dynamics of seemingly transnational histories and the imperial origins of contemporary globality.

Contributors. Ikuko Asaka, Oliver Charbonneau, Genevieve Clutario, Anne L. Foster, Julian Go, Michel Gobat, Julie Greene, Kristin L. Hoganson, Margaret D. Jacobs, Moon-Ho Jung, Marc-William Palen, Nicole M. Phelps, Jay Sexton, John Soluri, Stephen Tuffnell
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About the author

Kristin L. Hoganson is Stanley S. Stroup Professor of United States History at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and author of The Heartland: An American History.

Jay Sexton is Kinder Institute Chair in Constitutional Democracy and Professor of History at the University of Missouri and author of A Nation Forged by Crisis: A New American History.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Duke University Press
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Published on
Jan 3, 2020
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Pages
360
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ISBN
9781478007432
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Language
English
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Genres
History / World
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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