Taxing the Rich: A History of Fiscal Fairness in the United States and Europe

Princeton University Press
Free sample

In today's social climate of acknowledged and growing inequality, why are there not greater efforts to tax the rich? In this wide-ranging and provocative book, Kenneth Scheve and David Stasavage ask when and why countries tax their wealthiest citizens—and their answers may surprise you.

Taxing the Rich draws on unparalleled evidence from twenty countries over the last two centuries to provide the broadest and most in-depth history of progressive taxation available. Scheve and Stasavage explore the intellectual and political debates surrounding the taxation of the wealthy while also providing the most detailed examination to date of when taxes have been levied against the rich and when they haven't. Fairness in debates about taxing the rich has depended on different views of what it means to treat people as equals and whether taxing the rich advances or undermines this norm. Scheve and Stasavage argue that governments don't tax the rich just because inequality is high or rising—they do it when people believe that such taxes compensate for the state unfairly privileging the wealthy. Progressive taxation saw its heyday in the twentieth century, when compensatory arguments for taxing the rich focused on unequal sacrifice in mass warfare. Today, as technology gives rise to wars of more limited mobilization, such arguments are no longer persuasive.

Taxing the Rich shows how the future of tax reform will depend on whether political and economic conditions allow for new compensatory arguments to be made.

Read more

About the author

Kenneth Scheve is professor of political science and senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University. He is the coauthor of Globalization and the Perceptions of American Workers. David Stasavage is Julius Silver Professor in the Wilf Family Department of Politics at New York University. He is the author of States of Credit: Size, Power, and the Development of European Polities (Princeton).
Read more
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Princeton University Press
Read more
Published on
Mar 29, 2016
Read more
Pages
288
Read more
ISBN
9781400880379
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Business & Economics / Taxation / General
Political Science / American Government / National
Political Science / General
Political Science / Public Policy / Economic Policy
Political Science / Public Policy / Social Policy
Political Science / Public Policy / Social Services & Welfare
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
States of Credit provides the first comprehensive look at the joint development of representative assemblies and public borrowing in Europe during the medieval and early modern eras. In this pioneering book, David Stasavage argues that unique advances in political representation allowed certain European states to gain early and advantageous access to credit, but the emergence of an active form of political representation itself depended on two underlying factors: compact geography and a strong mercantile presence.

Stasavage shows that active representative assemblies were more likely to be sustained in geographically small polities. These assemblies, dominated by mercantile groups that lent to governments, were in turn more likely to preserve access to credit. Given these conditions, smaller European city-states, such as Genoa and Cologne, had an advantage over larger territorial states, including France and Castile, because mercantile elites structured political institutions in order to effectively monitor public credit. While creditor oversight of public funds became an asset for city-states in need of finance, Stasavage suggests that the long-run implications were more ambiguous. City-states with the best access to credit often had the most closed and oligarchic systems of representation, hindering their ability to accept new economic innovations. This eventually transformed certain city-states from economic dynamos into rentier republics.

Exploring the links between representation and debt in medieval and early modern Europe, States of Credit contributes to broad debates about state formation and Europe's economic rise.

NEW CUSTOMERS ARE WAITING...
FIND THEM ON FACEBOOKFacebook makes it easy for businesses like yours to share photos, videos, and posts to reach, engage, and sell to more than 1 billion active users. Advertising expert Perry Marshall is joined by co-authors Keith Krance and Thomas Meloche as he walks you through Facebook Advertising and its nuances to help you pinpoint your ideal audience and gain a ten-fold return on your investment.
Now in its third edition, Ultimate Guide to Facebook Advertising takes you further than Facebook itself by exploring what happens before customers click on your ads and what needs to happen after—10 seconds later, 10 minutes later, and in the following days and weeks.
You'll discover how to: Maximize your ad ROI with newsfeeds, videos, and branded content Create custom audiences from your contact lists, video views, and page engagement Use the Facebook Campaign Blueprint proven to generate your first 100 conversions Boost your Facebook ads using the Audience Network and Instagram Follow the three-step formula for successful video ads Maximize campaigns and increase conversions on all traffic to your website Track and retarget engaged users by leveraging the Power of the Pixel Make every page on your website 5-10 percent more effective overnight "If anybody can make practical sense of Facebook for marketers, it's Perry. He has his finger on its truth—as advertising media, not social media. He also realizes there is a short window of time during which it offers greatest opportunity. He identified this with Google AdWords. Now, this book shows how to capitalize on ideal timing with this media. Finally, he is a well-disciplined direct-response practitioner who holds this accountable for ROI. I bestow my 'No B.S.' blessing."
—Dan S. Kennedy, legendary direct marketing advisor and author of the No B.S. series.
States of Credit provides the first comprehensive look at the joint development of representative assemblies and public borrowing in Europe during the medieval and early modern eras. In this pioneering book, David Stasavage argues that unique advances in political representation allowed certain European states to gain early and advantageous access to credit, but the emergence of an active form of political representation itself depended on two underlying factors: compact geography and a strong mercantile presence.

Stasavage shows that active representative assemblies were more likely to be sustained in geographically small polities. These assemblies, dominated by mercantile groups that lent to governments, were in turn more likely to preserve access to credit. Given these conditions, smaller European city-states, such as Genoa and Cologne, had an advantage over larger territorial states, including France and Castile, because mercantile elites structured political institutions in order to effectively monitor public credit. While creditor oversight of public funds became an asset for city-states in need of finance, Stasavage suggests that the long-run implications were more ambiguous. City-states with the best access to credit often had the most closed and oligarchic systems of representation, hindering their ability to accept new economic innovations. This eventually transformed certain city-states from economic dynamos into rentier republics.

Exploring the links between representation and debt in medieval and early modern Europe, States of Credit contributes to broad debates about state formation and Europe's economic rise.

©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.