Life of Black Hawk, or Ma-ka-tai-me-she-kia-kiak: Dictated by Himself

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A rediscovered, defiant work of Native American literature, presented here on the 175th anniversary of its first publication

Upon its publication in 1833, this unflinching narrative by the vanquished Sauk leader Black Hawk was the first thoroughly adversarial account of frontier hostilities between white settlers and Native Americans. Black Hawk, a complex, contradictory figure, relates his life story and that of his people, who had been forced from western Illinois in what was known as the Black Hawk War. The first published account of a victim of the American war of extermination, this vivid portrait of Indian life stands as a tribute to the author and his extraordinary people, as well as an invaluable historical document.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.
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About the author

J. Gerald Kennedy is William A. Read Professor of English at Louisiana State University.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Penguin
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Published on
May 27, 2008
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Pages
144
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ISBN
9781101126738
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Cultural, Ethnic & Regional / General
History / Native American
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / Native American Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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