Technology Shocks: Origins, Managerial Responses, and Firm Performance

Springer Science & Business Media
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Radical technological changes (so-called "technology shocks") frequently disrupt the competitive market structure. New entrants appear, industries need to be redefined, incumbents lose their positions or vanish completely. Fast moving industries - like the often quoted example of the semiconductor industry - have preferably been analyzed for these phenomena. But do the findings hold for industries with longer development cycles like the global machine tool industry?
Here, the multivariate analysis is used to find out what management needs to focus on in order to lead companies through the technology shocks. The research for this book builds on in-depth interviews with 100 experts and decision makers from the machine tool industry involved in technology shocks and statistical analysis of detailed quantitative surveys collected from 58 companies. In several instances the results challenge classical teaching of technology management.
Adrian J. Slywotzky - US top selling business author and one of the most distinguished intellectual leaders in business - comments:
"In Technology Shocks, Heinrich Arnold develops a very useful model for analyzing technology shocks, and for focusing on those factors that will enable a company to navigate through these shocks successfully, and repeatedly. Although this work is focused on technology, its thinking has useful implications beyond technology shocks. It provides ideas that managers can use to protect their firms when they are faced with any type of discontinuity, technology-based or not".
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
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Published on
Dec 6, 2012
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Pages
264
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ISBN
9783642574030
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / General
Business & Economics / Management
Business & Economics / Management Science
Business & Economics / Production & Operations Management
Business & Economics / Research & Development
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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In practically oriented studies, innovation strategy is consistently iden- fied as a key success factor for innovation performance as well as susta- able, overall firm performance. Empirical research has, in comparison to other aspects of innovation management, not devoted much attention to this topic. In addition to this lack of empirically validated results, there is a deficit of clear definition in terms of what is actually meant by inno- tion strategy. Nanja Strecker’s dissertation starts there and concentrates on three central questions: What characterizes innovation strategy of companies? To what extend does a relationship between innovation str- egy and a firm’s performance exist and which critical conditions need to be considered for this relationship? Nanja identifies and answers these practically as well as scientifically highly relevant and interesting research questions. The research was conducted in a highly competent manner. Particularly worth emphasizing is the coherent deduction of the conceptual framework as well as the hypotheses, considering prior empirical evidence in a very comprehensive manner. The good conceptual part is even - ceeded by the sophisticated empirical study. Impressively, Nanja proves her methodological competence and diligence when analyzing her data. The presented results are very interesting and, to a large extend, support the formulated hypotheses. Moreover, the present study states meani- ful suggestions for future research in innovation management. For m- agement practice in particular, Nanja’s research provides interesting - vice on how to improve firms’ innovation management.
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Christensen contends that by understanding what causes customers to "hire" a product or service, any business can improve its innovation track record, creating products that customers not only want to hire, but that they’ll pay premium prices to bring into their lives. Jobs theory offers new hope for growth to companies frustrated by their hit and miss efforts.

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