Deep in a Dream: The Long Night of Chet Baker

Chicago Review Press
2
Free sample

From his emergence in the 1950s as an uncannily beautiful young Oklahoman who became the prince of "cool" jazz seemingly overnight to his violent, drug-related death in Amsterdam in 1988, Chet Baker lived a life that has become an American myth. Drawing on hundreds of interviews and previously untapped sources, this first major biography of one of the most romanticized icons in jazz gives a thrilling account of the trumpeter's dark journey. Author James Gavin delves deeply into Baker's tormented childhood, the origins of his melancholic trumpet playing, and even reveals the long-unsolved riddle of Baker's demise. Baker's otherworldly personal aura struck a note of menace and mystery that catapulted him to fame in the staid 1950s but as time wore on, his romance with drugs became highly publicized. Gavin narrates the harrowing spiral of dependency down which Baker tumbled and illustrates how those who dared to get close were dragged down with him. This is the portrait of a musician whose singular artistry and mystique has never lost the power to enchant and seduce.
Read more

About the author

James Gavin is a frequent contributor to the New York Times, among other publications. He lives in New York City. His latest book is a biography entitled, Stormy Weather: Lena Horne. The book is entitled, Stormy Waether: The Life of Lena Horne.

Read more
4.5
2 total
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Chicago Review Press
Read more
Published on
Jul 31, 2011
Read more
Pages
440
Read more
ISBN
9781569769034
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Composers & Musicians
Biography & Autobiography / Entertainment & Performing Arts
Music / Genres & Styles / Jazz
Music / Individual Composer & Musician
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.

At long last, the first serious biography of entertainment legend Lena Horne -- the celebrated star of film, stage, and music who became one of the first African-American icons.

At the 2001 Academy Awards, Halle Berry thanked Lena Horne for paving the way for her to become the first black recipient of a Best Actress Oscar. Though limited, mostly to guest singing appearances in splashy Hollywood musicals, "the beautiful Lena Horne," as she was often called, became a pioneering star for African Americans in the 1940s and fifties. Now James Gavin, author of Deep in a Dream: The Long Night of Chet Baker, draws on a wealth of unmined material and hundreds of interviews -- one of them with Horne herself -- to give us the defining portrait of an American icon.

Gavin has gotten closer than any other writer to the celebrity who has lived in reclusion since 1998. Incorporating insights from the likes of Ruby Dee, Tony Bennett, Diahann Carroll, Arthur Laurents, and several of Horne's fellow chorines from Harlem's Cotton Club, Stormy Weather offers a fascinating portrait of a complex, even tragic Horne -- a stunning talent who inspired such giants of showbiz as Barbra Streisand, Eartha Kitt, and Aretha Franklin, but whose frustrations with racism, and with tumultuous, root-less childhood, left wounds too deep to heal. The woman who emerged was as angry as she was luminous.

From the Cotton Club's glory days and the back lots of Hollywood's biggest studios to the glitzy but bigoted hotels of Las Vegas's heyday, this behind-the-scenes look at an American icon is as much a story of the limits of the American dream as it is a masterful, ground-breaking biography.
Praised by the New York Times Book Review as “fascinating, suspenseful, careful, musically detailed, and insightful,” this is a long-overdue biography of recording artist and musical legend Peggy Lee.

Miss Peggy Lee cast a spell when she sang. She epitomized cool, but her trademark song, “Fever”—covered by Beyoncé and Madonna—is the essence of sizzling sexual heat. Her jazz sense dazzled Ray Charles, Duke Ellington, and Louis Armstrong. She was the voice of swing, the voice of blues, and she provided four of the voices for Walt Disney’s Lady and the Tramp, whose score she co-wrote. But who was the woman behind the Mona Lisa smile?

With elegant writing and impeccable research, including interviews with hundreds who knew Lee, acclaimed music journalist James Gavin offers the most revealing look yet at an artist of infinite contradictions and layers. Lee was a North Dakota prairie girl who became a temptress of enduring mystique. She was a singer-songwriter before the term existed. Lee “had incredible confidence onstage,” observed the Godfather of Punk, Iggy Pop; yet inner turmoil wracked her. She spun a romantic nirvana in her songs, but couldn’t sustain one in reality. As she passed middle age, Lee dwelled increasingly in a bizarre dreamland. She died in 2002 at the age of eighty-one, but the enchantment with Lee has only grown.

“Raucously entertaining [and] full of evocative scenes, wry humor and exasperated sympathy” (Publishers Weekly), Is That All There Is? paints a masterful portrait of an artist who redefined popular singing.

At long last, the first serious biography of entertainment legend Lena Horne -- the celebrated star of film, stage, and music who became one of the first African-American icons.

At the 2001 Academy Awards, Halle Berry thanked Lena Horne for paving the way for her to become the first black recipient of a Best Actress Oscar. Though limited, mostly to guest singing appearances in splashy Hollywood musicals, "the beautiful Lena Horne," as she was often called, became a pioneering star for African Americans in the 1940s and fifties. Now James Gavin, author of Deep in a Dream: The Long Night of Chet Baker, draws on a wealth of unmined material and hundreds of interviews -- one of them with Horne herself -- to give us the defining portrait of an American icon.

Gavin has gotten closer than any other writer to the celebrity who has lived in reclusion since 1998. Incorporating insights from the likes of Ruby Dee, Tony Bennett, Diahann Carroll, Arthur Laurents, and several of Horne's fellow chorines from Harlem's Cotton Club, Stormy Weather offers a fascinating portrait of a complex, even tragic Horne -- a stunning talent who inspired such giants of showbiz as Barbra Streisand, Eartha Kitt, and Aretha Franklin, but whose frustrations with racism, and with tumultuous, root-less childhood, left wounds too deep to heal. The woman who emerged was as angry as she was luminous.

From the Cotton Club's glory days and the back lots of Hollywood's biggest studios to the glitzy but bigoted hotels of Las Vegas's heyday, this behind-the-scenes look at an American icon is as much a story of the limits of the American dream as it is a masterful, ground-breaking biography.
Praised by the New York Times Book Review as “fascinating, suspenseful, careful, musically detailed, and insightful,” this is a long-overdue biography of recording artist and musical legend Peggy Lee.

Miss Peggy Lee cast a spell when she sang. She epitomized cool, but her trademark song, “Fever”—covered by Beyoncé and Madonna—is the essence of sizzling sexual heat. Her jazz sense dazzled Ray Charles, Duke Ellington, and Louis Armstrong. She was the voice of swing, the voice of blues, and she provided four of the voices for Walt Disney’s Lady and the Tramp, whose score she co-wrote. But who was the woman behind the Mona Lisa smile?

With elegant writing and impeccable research, including interviews with hundreds who knew Lee, acclaimed music journalist James Gavin offers the most revealing look yet at an artist of infinite contradictions and layers. Lee was a North Dakota prairie girl who became a temptress of enduring mystique. She was a singer-songwriter before the term existed. Lee “had incredible confidence onstage,” observed the Godfather of Punk, Iggy Pop; yet inner turmoil wracked her. She spun a romantic nirvana in her songs, but couldn’t sustain one in reality. As she passed middle age, Lee dwelled increasingly in a bizarre dreamland. She died in 2002 at the age of eighty-one, but the enchantment with Lee has only grown.

“Raucously entertaining [and] full of evocative scenes, wry humor and exasperated sympathy” (Publishers Weekly), Is That All There Is? paints a masterful portrait of an artist who redefined popular singing.
La gran biografía de Chet Baker, el legendario trompetista y cantante de jazz.

Desde 1950, cuando un atractivo joven de Oklahoma apareció en la Costa Oeste como nuevo príncipe del cool jazz, hasta su violenta muerte en Amsterdam relacionada con las drogas, la vida de Chet Baker lo convirtió en un mito.

En esta biografía, que incluye cientos de entrevistas y fuentes inéditas, James Gavin hace un recorrido por la vida del trompetista. La historia de Chet Baker es desmenuzada desde su atormentada y traumática infancia: Gavin explora el nacimiento de esa melancólica forma de tocar la trompeta, su voz frágil, y el aura que lo llevó a la fama. Sexy, angelical, rebelde y querido, Chet Baker se convirtió en el James Dean del jazz. Su misteriosa figura volvió locos a mujeres y hombres. Sin embargo, su verdadero amor, además de la música, fue la droga.

La crítica ha dicho...
«Arrebatadora y fascinante. Trae de regreso la persona de Baker entre los vivos. El corazón de este libro late muchísimo más fuerte que la inmensa mayoría de las biografías de músicos.»
The Boston Globe

«Una biografía extraordinaria y monumental.»
La Stampa

«Una formidable muestra de arte biográfico. No hay una sola página en este libro que no sea adictiva, que no esté viva, que no le exija al lector una reacción, ya sea de horror o admiración.»
Greil Marcus, Salon

«Un retrato casi insoportablemente realista. James Gavin nos ha puesto al personaje tan cerca como la vida misma.»
David Hajdu, New York Times Book Review

«Una biografía divulgativa imprescindible.»
Tony Gieske, Hollywood Reporter

«El retrato más redondo y lúcido del trompetista que ha sido escrito jamás. Esta es la biografía definitiva de Baker.»
Christopher Porter, JazzTimes

«Completísima, una biografía de lectura compulsiva.»
Jack Batten, Toronto Star

«Un relato espeluznante. Debería atraer a toda persona interesada en una historia perfectamente narrada.»
Greg Delaney, Independent

«Una comedia negra repleta de desenfreno, escrita con un ritmo y visión a los que ni siquiera el purista del jazz más esencialista le encontraría un defecto.»
Kenneth Wright, Sunday Herald

«Un libro nacido del amor artístico y la honestidad intelectual, escrito con la fluidez y el dramatismo de una novela.»
Paolo Russo, La Repubblica

«Una brillante y oscura biografía de la leyenda blanca del jazz. Baker es un misterio al que James Gavin se asomó atento a las contradicciones.»
Diego Fischerman, Página/12

En los blogs...
«Esta biografía está repleta de momentos de jeringas, narcóticos y sangre. Temblores, sudores y dinero cambiando de manos en busca de una nueva dosis. Recetas robadas o falsificadas, intentos honestos y fracasados de rehabilitación, y figuras patéticas de admiradores o amigos que tras una sincera admiración fueron capaces de suponer para él una nueva excusa para su reenganche.»
Francismo Martínez, Blog Fantasymundo

©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.