Soviet Scientists and the State: An Examination of the Social and Political Aspects of Science in the USSR

SUNY Press
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Soviet Scientists and the State examines the constraints place upon the natural scientist in the Soviet Union. The book brings into sharp relief the social and economic consequences arising from the highly centralized character of Communist Party rule. Because conditions regarded as essential for effective scientific research conflict with the form of political control prevailing in the Soviet Union, the Soviet scientists’ working environment provides a fruitful context for assessing the methods adopted by the Communist Party. This study is an excellent base from which to explore some important sources of change in contemporary Soviet politics.

The book is also a survey of the present state of natural science in the U.S.S.R. Topics of concern range from the scientists’ background and social characteristics, institutions, status, and leadership to their social relations and effectiveness. The relationship of the Communist Party to the scientists is examined in detail.
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About the author

Peter Kneen is Lecturer in Politics at the University of Durham, England.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
Jan 1, 1984
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Pages
138
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ISBN
9781438409399
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Now is the time for the American people to take the first step toward reclaiming what belongs to them. The task is daunting, but it is imperative if we are to be truly free.
#1 New York Times bestselling author and radio host Mark R. Levin delivers a "bracing meditation” (National Review) on the ways our government has failed the next generation.

In modern America, the civil society is being steadily devoured by a ubiquitous federal government. But as the government grows into an increasingly authoritarian and centralized federal Leviathan, many parents continue to tolerate, if not enthusiastically champion, grievous public policies that threaten their children and successive generations with a grim future at the hands of a brazenly expanding and imploding entitlement state poised to burden them with massive debt, mediocre education, waves of immigration, and a deteriorating national defense.

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