Snow Goose Chronicles

Liberty Publishing House
Free sample

Samilenko’s The Snow Goose Chronicles describes what can only be called the genocide of the peasants. She includes the GULAGs, labor camps in Karelia, especially “Solovki” located in the former “Solovetsky” Monastery on a Northern island where inmates starved and froze to death.
 
The Snow Goose Chronicles is must reading for anyone interested in the history of Ukraine its life and fate of Ukrainian peasants during the Soviet period. Anyone interested in getting to know a simple, lovable, morally upright human being will reread this book time and again.

A great read!
–Helen Segall
Professor Emerita of Russian Language and Literature

 
В «Снежном гусе» автор в качестве скальпеля использует острый меч, чтобы без горечи или злобы, но решительно вскрыть гнойные раны, которые ее народу нанесла и надеялась навсегда скрыть под незажившими рубцами советская власть. И это бы ей удалось, если бы не Снежный гусь, который в качестве беспристрастного свидетеля и летописца присутствует в повествовании от начала до последней точки.
–Владимир Войнович
 
The Snow Goose Chronicles is a moving, well-paced story with living characters doing the best they can to survive Stalinism. Olya Samilenko takes us on a fascinating ride through twentieth-century Ukraine and its tragic history, as experienced by two Ukrainians and two Jews.
–Professor Alexander Motyl,
Rutgers University-Newark

 
Absurdity and verisimilitude coexist in this fluid tale, whose frequent allusions to Gogol – there is even a Comrade Chichikov – serve both to heighten and to assuage the tragedy of the romance.
–Dr. Isaiah Gruber,
Historian, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

 
“Snow Goose” reads like a frightening mystery…. have to put it down and then rush back to read more.
–Ulana Mazurkevich
President, Ukrainian Human Rights Committee
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About the author

Olya Samilenko, Ph.D., is currently an Associate Professor of Russian at Goucher College in Baltimore, and the Director of the Johns Hopkins-Goucher College Cooperative Program in Russian Language, Literature and Culture. Her specialty is short prose and satire. Among Samilenko's recent publications is a chapter in the report of the U.S. Commission on the Ukrainian Famine 1932-1933.

Samilenko was born in New York City, as the child of Ukrainian immigrants. She grew up with the stories told and retold by her parents and their friends of life in the Ukraine that she never knew. Samilenko's intensive research into documentary sources and archives has enlivened and enriched The Snow Goose Chronicles.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Liberty Publishing House
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Published on
Jun 8, 2016
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Pages
404
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ISBN
9781628040616
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Romance / Historical / 20th Century
History / Russia & the Former Soviet Union
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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