Britain's Day-flying Moths: A Field Guide to the Day-flying Moths of Great Britain and Ireland, Fully Revised and Updated Second Edition, Edition 2

Princeton University Press
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A carefully designed and beautifully illustrated photographic guide to the moths you are most likely to see during the day

This concise photographic field guide helps you to identify the day-flying moths most likely to be seen in Great Britain and Ireland. It combines stunning photographs, clear and authoritative text and an easy-to-use design to increase your knowledge and enjoyment of these intriguing and often colourful insects. Like butterflies, some moths fly regularly in sunshine, whereas others that usually fly at night are readily disturbed from their resting places during the day. This guide describes all of these species and features at least one photograph of each in its natural, resting pose. A brief description of each moth covers the key identification features and when and where to look for it, and includes information on its status, life history, special features and caterpillar food plants. Other sections explain how to distinguish moths from butterflies, and also provide essential information on biology, classification, habitats, gardening for moths, conservation and legislation and recording and monitoring.

  • Individual accounts for 158 species and photos of 28 others
  • More than 320 stunning photos, with every moth shown as you see it
  • Beautifully designed, easy to use and clearly written
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About the author

David Newland is an emeritus professor of engineering at Cambridge University and has had a lifelong interest in butterflies and moths. Robert Still is publishing director of WILDGuides and a prolific natural history author. Andy Swash is managing director of WILDGuides and a well-known wildlife photographer and author. The three are also coauthors of Britain's Butterflies (Princeton WILDGuides).
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Additional Information

Publisher
Princeton University Press
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Published on
Aug 20, 2019
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Pages
232
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ISBN
9780691198958
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Nature / Animals / Butterflies & Moths
Nature / Reference
Nature / Regional
Reference / General
Travel / Special Interest / Ecotourism
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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