Plato in Renaissance England

International Archives of the History of Ideas Archives internationales d'histoire des idées

Book 141
Springer Science & Business Media
1
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This book offers a radical reappraisal of the reputation of Plato in England between 1423 and 1603. Using many materials not hitherto available, including evidence of book publishing and book ownership, together with a comprehensive survey of allusions to Plato, the author shows that the English were far less interested in Plato than most historians have thought. Although the English, like the French, knew the `court' Plato as well as the `school' Plato, the English published only two works by Plato during this period, while the French published well over 100 editions, including several of the complete Works. In England allusions to Plato occur more often in prose writers such as Whetstone, Green, and Lodge, than in poets like Spenser and Chapman. Sidney did take his `Stella' from Plato, but most English allusions to Plato were taken not directly from Plato or from Ficino, but from other authors, especially Mornay, Nani-Mirabelli, Ricchieri, Steuco, and Tixier.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
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Published on
Jun 29, 2013
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Pages
204
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ISBN
9789401585514
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Language
English
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Genres
Foreign Language Study / German
History / General
Philosophy / General
Philosophy / History & Surveys / Modern
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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The general view of scholars is that the Kabbalah had no meaningful influence on Leibniz's thought. } But on the basis of new evidence I am convinced that the question must be reopened. The Kabbalah did influence Leibniz, and a recognition of this will lead to both a better understanding of the supposed "quirkiness,,2 of Leibniz's philosophy and an appreciation ofthe Kabbalah as an integral but hitherto ignored factor in the emergence of the modem secular and scientifically oriented world. During the past twenty years there has been increasing willingness to recognize the important ways in which mystical and occult thinking contributed to the development of science and the emergence 3 of toleration. However, the Kabbalah, particularly the Lurianic Kabbalah with its monistic vitalism and optimistic philosophy of perfectionism and universal salvation, has not yet been integrated into the new historiography, although it richly deserves to be. On the basis of manuscripts in libraries at Hanover and Wolfenbiittel, it is clear that Leibniz's relationship with Francis Mercury van Helmont (1614- 1698) and Christian Knorr von Rosenroth (1636-1689), the two leading Christian Kabbalists of the period, was much closer than previously imagined and that his direct knowledge of their writings, especially the collection of 4 kabbalistic texts they published in the Kabbala Denudata, was far more detailed than most scholars have realized. During 1688 Leibniz spent more than a month at Sulzbach with von Rosenroth.
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